Sick Hen

IcedCoffeez

Hatching
Nov 23, 2018
2
1
7
It is about 12 degrees outside right now, but the coop is heated so it’s not that cold in there. My brother was feeding them a bit ago and brought one of the hens in, a three year old golden laced Wyandotte hen.

She is refusing to stand at all and just sits on the ground and puffs up her feathers, sometimes closing her eyes. We checked her feet because it seemed to be the left one that was bugging her, but nothing seemed to be wrong with them.

She’s eating a tiny bit and drinking a bit of water. But she is still refusing to stand, as of now she is with me in the house where I can keep an eye of her. But I am puzzled as to what’s happening with her.

Any help is greatly appreciated thank you. If you need more info just ask and I’ll try to answer. Thanks!
 
Last edited:

Eggcessive

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Do they go out of the coop every day, and go back into the heated coop? With temperatures near single digits, you may see some frostbite especially if the humidity is high, or if the chicken step into water or a wet spot. Do you have a thermometer to see what the indoor temperature is?
Pictures of the feet and legs are welcome.

Look at the foot pads for any scabs or sores. Check her for a stuck egg by inserting one finger inside her vent up to 2 inches. Is she pooping okay, and what does that look like? There could be a leg or foot injury, but Mareks disease could also be a possibility.

I would place her near food and water, and encourage her to eat some cooked egg or a little tuna or liver. Instead of making oatmeal, add a lot of water to a small bowl of chicken feed and stir. A chicken sling may be useful to get her upright and in front of food and water. Here are some examples:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/versions-of-chick-chairs-please.1166308/
 

BullChick

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Apr 17, 2012
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Checking for an egg can be simpler since you sound young. Just feel her from the outside for an egg.
An egg bound chicken needs a warm (not hot! She isn’t a soup) bath. She will likely fall asleep while she soaks for about fifteen minutes.
Scrambled eggs are the most recommended food for ill chickens.
 

micstrachan

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Hi there. If you press on the bottom of your hen’s foot, can she grasp your hand? I am wondering if she cannot or will not stand. There is a difference. A sling is a good idea. Can you take a short video of her when you try to get her to stand, post it on you tube, and link it to this thread? You just spread “share” and copy the link.
 

IcedCoffeez

Hatching
Nov 23, 2018
2
1
7
Checking for an egg can be simpler since you sound young. Just feel her from the outside for an egg.
An egg bound chicken needs a warm (not hot! She isn’t a soup) bath. She will likely fall asleep while she soaks for about fifteen minutes.
Scrambled eggs are the most recommended food for ill chickens.

Haha yeah, I’m 17. She unfortunately passed away the same night a few hours later. She was not egg bound, I had already checked her for it, because another hen was egg bound a few months ago and I knew what to check for.
Thank you so much for your help
 

Eggcessive

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Apr 3, 2011
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Sorry that you lost your hen. It is best to get a necropsy by your state poultry vet or lab to get a diagnosis, or to look for something like Mareks disease. Sometimes we can do them at home to see the more obvious problems, such as cancer, ascites, egg yolk peritonitis, kidney disease, and others.
 

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