six week old chicks and four week old chicks HELP

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Rayben2006, Nov 15, 2012.

  1. Rayben2006

    Rayben2006 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My six week old chicks some of them have lumps developing an feather loss one of them almost completly bald looks like a type of chicken mange with tumors any sugestions they are eatting well an dont seemed to be effected by it YET!!! THE FOUER WEEK OLD CHICK ARE IN SAME LOCATION JUST DIFFERENT CAGE
     
  2. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry to say, but this is most probably a disease ... wash your hands well, and move the cages to different locations if at all possible. And, do not handle either w/o washing up before and after, so as to reduce the chances that you might infect the unaffected birds.

    Can you post closeup images, or detailed description, and check 'em for additional symptoms please?

    :: edit :: check the base of the shafts on the nearly bald bird very closely for any deposits, and see where these lumps/tumors are located. :: /edit ::
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2012
  3. Rayben2006

    Rayben2006 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  4. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Those pictures might help others (plus posting keeps the tread more active ~'-)

    I can't see very well, so only extremely close inspection is gonna work for me. But, diagnosis is often determining the exact details of any blisters/bumps/nodules/etc. (i.e. blackened dots in the centers, yellow crusting on the edges, blistering w/ wet surface, dry irregular edges, and so on).

    You can begin by checking the Diagnosing Diseases Based Upon Symptoms link in my signature, and read it over ... not just lookin' for these specific ones, but skimming over it a few times serves to improve our ability to spot things we might otherwise overlook.

    Also, check this link ... a vet's online book about diseases/infections/etc. w/ lots of good pictures you can compare.

    Look to see if these bumps appear to have begun to form around bites of any kind. Check inside the affected/infected bird's mouths for blistering/swelling/etc. (and any films or coatings), and look around their eyes very closely (often the point of entry for contagious diseases). Try 'n determine if there is any pattern that is consistent from one bird to the next.

    And, not to make you overly paranoid, but keep your hands away from your face 'til you scrub up, and then return to disinfect door knobs, light switches, faucet handles, the soles of your shoes, etc., so as to not place yourself or your other birds at any increased risk of exposure.
     
  5. Rayben2006

    Rayben2006 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    were keeping the kids away from them for now an constally washing hands after handling. they are gradually getting worst an a couple of them look like their feet are swelling !!!!! i am going to attempt to take some better pics i have about 30 chickens in that room so i am going to separate them right NOW!! but they are all probley exposed to what ever this is. thank you cowcreekgeek for the link i will utlize it and if any one else has a clue HELP ME help my easter egg chicks[​IMG]
     
  6. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OTHERS TO THIS THREAD: Please suggest your own suspicions, as I'm mostly guessin' on this one ...

    The possible list is still rather large, and other symptoms most probably just haven't presented yet. Check under the wings for moisture in the affected/infected birds (check the healthy one first, before handling those showing these symptoms). Check to see if their eyes are watery, or if there are any other changes ... you'll wanna watch for changes in color and/or size of these places, and swelling of (or nodules appearing on) the face, the mouth, or around the eyes.

    My first suspicion would be Fowl pox, except that there are no nodules on the combs. The face will most probably swell if it's Infectious coryza or Necastle disease. If it were Merek's disease, you would be most likely be seeing some form of paralysis to their legs. But, if their legs are rough and scaly? That could further indicate Fowl pox.

    If the swelling is specifically the joints of the leg, then consider Infectious synovitis (which causes swelling to the pads as well), paratyphoid, pullorum and staphylococcosis as well.

    Check their dropping ... If they're bloody, then it's probably Newcastle's disease (unless they're suffering from cecal coccidiosis as well). Light yellow or yellowish-green indicates Fowl typhoid or fowl cholera, and sulfur yellow is indicative of Blackhead.

    I know that's a lot, but perhaps you can start w/ the long list and begin to rule out some of these 'too many' possibilities ...
     
  7. Rayben2006

    Rayben2006 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    can anyone HELP I have no clue they look horrable but still they act as if thow nothing is wrong eating well aN MOVING AROUND NORMAL
     
  8. janinepeters

    janinepeters Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would guess this is the cutaneous (skin) form of Marek's disease. I have no personal experience, but have read about it. Google and read about it, and see if it fits with what you are seeing. There is no treatment for the disease and its course is highly variable.
     
  9. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Diseases that spread quickly and do great harm as extremely stressful, and heart-breaking, and an emotional response is normal, and to be expected. But, it is only a logical response that will help your flock, and deductive reasoning that leads to possibly treating them.

    I redirect you back to my last post, and ask that you begin running down the list of possibilities, to which I'll add two for which there really is no cure: Merek's has multiple forms, but we only often hear about a few, but I also wonder if this could be the early stages of gangrenous dermatitis. However, my logic is to initially try 'n treat what I can, or at least prepare the birds for any possible treatment once the cause is known ...

    If you have not yet replace their water with the astringent solution, you need to ... clean your equipment w/ 5% bleach solution, and mix 4 teaspoons of Apple Cider Vinegar into each gallon of water (specifically Apple Cider, not white, and not in galvanized containers). The tannin from the apples reduces the viscosity of the mucus and helps them to expel it more easily, and helps to remove any coating in the mouth, throat and intestines, which improves uptake on nutrients/vitamins, and any medication(s) that you may be giving them next. Continue this until and unless other chemical compounds are required.

    Again? I'm not meanin' to brush of your feelings here ... just had my own battle w/ the toxins from botulism, which resulted in what most folks call limber neck, and the Apple Cider Vinegar saved all but the one that was already dead (the source of exposure) and the worst of the guineas. One's still a bit under the weather, but mostly 'cause the rest beat her up a bit under their feet. The point I'm tryin' to make is that, as painful dealin' w/ this sorta thing surely is for you, panic serves no purpose in determining the cause, which determines treatment ...
     
  10. janinepeters

    janinepeters Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Naa. Birds would appear extremely ill. OP says they're eating well and don't appear affected by it.
     

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