1. Nigellas

    Nigellas Chillin' With My Peeps

    542
    4
    148
    Jun 14, 2008
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Does my small hutch need a slope to the design? Most of the coops I've seen have a sloped roof... It would obviously be easier to not have to make one, so I'm guessing there is a functional reason for the slope... Is it important? Do I need to build it sloped? If it makes a difference, we are only going to be housing 2, 3 max. Coop will be roughly 4x2, with the attached run 8x4 (side note - is that big enough?)


    thanks again for your help!
    [​IMG]
     
  2. ChickenToes

    ChickenToes Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 14, 2008
    NE Wisconsin
    No, your coop does not need a sloped roof. I think most people build coops with a sloped roof because most houses have a sloped roof - rain runs right off of a sloped roof, and in the winter the snow slides right off on sunny days.

    The 8 x 4 run seems a bit small...can you perhaps go with an 8 x 6 or an 8 x 8?

    Good luck with your coop!
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    109
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Mainly in larger structures it is so that you don't get rain puddling and leaking thru the shingles, and so you don't get damagingly heavy amounts of snow building up.

    However, in a hutch-type structure there are 2 benefits to a slightly sloped roof: water does not puddle on the roof which will tend to make it rot faster and warp if it is plywood; and so that you're controlling which direction it runs off, to direct it away from the run (if not roofed) and the area where you stand to work. It only takes like an inch or so of slope to do these things though. And if your roof will not be harmed by standing water and you don't care about mudpuddles, then indeed there is probably no reason to have it sloped.

    Have fun,

    Pat
     
  4. s6bee

    s6bee Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2007
    Western, NY
    It's mostly to run off precipitation and snow. So it's up to you. Even a small pitch will help with run off if it's of any concern.
     
  5. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

    5,518
    73
    308
    Feb 4, 2007
    Leesville, SC
    Add a pitch to the roof. 2:1 is the minimum. It's done to nearly all structures for good reason, you know.
    I was in the roofing contract business, once. The worst roofs to deal with? Flat ones, and even they are not "flat." They, too, have slopes and runoff.
    The roof is designed as an integral protection for the structure. It isn't an after thought. Don't fight this one - give it a pitch.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 16, 2008
  6. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    109
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    I am not disagreeing with Elderoo, I would build it with some pitch to the roof too, just because it's 'better' -- BUT, I would like to point out that for a tiny rabbit hutch type structure it may, in fact, not matter *much*.

    And Elderoo, you know, if historical precedent is important to you, note that rabbit hutches are not traditionally built with much if any pitch to the roof, so is it possible that all of the century-old rabbit hutch designers knew what they were doing <ducking and running>

    Pat
     
  7. cheeptrick

    cheeptrick Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 1, 2007
    New Hampshire
    I'd suggest a FLAT pitched roof...if you have snow. That way the snow slides off in the back instead of in front of the doors...LESS shoveling if you live in a colder climate! [​IMG]
     
  8. GallowayFarms

    GallowayFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    148
    2
    111
    May 19, 2008
    I think your run is big enough. If you don't want to try and build a slant roof. you can just put two bricks under your house in the front and one brick under each corner in the back and make the roof slope if it is on level ground. Most of the time you want the slope away from the side with the doors so you don't have a water puddle in the front where you will stand.



    When you put the bedding in the house you can level the bedding and the chickens won't know the difference.

    Good Luck with the chicks. You will have a blast.
     
  9. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

    5,518
    73
    308
    Feb 4, 2007
    Leesville, SC
    And Elderoo, you know, if historical precedent is important to you, note that rabbit hutches are not traditionally built with much if any pitch to the roof, so is it possible that all of the century-old rabbit hutch designers knew what they were doing <ducking and running>

    Dont duck and run from me Pat. If there is one person among many I respect, it's you. I listen when you talk.

    Flat roofs on rabbits hutches? Is it safe to say that rabbits have the same needs as chickens? I dunno, I never raised them. I AM willing to say nothing is written in stone [​IMG]

    Im not saying that you should put a 6:1 pitch and architectural shingles on any coop. Hell, felt and tar would do nicely.
    But most are intended to be both permanent and confined, as you and I have noted many times. That being said, it is only prudent that moisture outside the water fonts is to be avoided. I cant imagine that would differ for rabbits. It could be that tradition only repeats what it has already known - good or bad. That is, I might add, the only real danger in blindly following it.

    Pitch the roof; a simple shed design will do . Don't fight this one. It won't add significantly to your costs or labor and, well - what's it gonna hurt?​
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 16, 2008
  10. Ringo71

    Ringo71 Out Of The Brooder

    29
    0
    22
    May 17, 2008
    Ohio
    Giver sum swope! [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by