Some advice please.....When can I "mix" my ducks?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Betsih, Sep 24, 2012.

  1. Betsih

    Betsih New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Sep 14, 2012
    My family ordered 8 ducks and only 1 survived shipping. The hatchery is sending replacements. They are due to arrive in the next 2 days. How long do we need to keep the new babies separate from the older one? Being in northern Michigan, I want to get the together ASAP so the babies can get warmth from the older duck. We will keep them in the house as long as possible, but 7 ducklings will be messy and loud.

    Any advice or suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks!

    Betsi
     
  2. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    43,515
    465
    486
    Dec 22, 2009
    How much older is the other duck going to be?
     
  3. Betsih

    Betsih New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Sep 14, 2012
    Sorry, my brain thought it, but my fingers didn't type it. LOL

    Lucky was hatched September 3, shipped on September 4 according to the hatchery. So, about 3 1/2 weeks when the new ones get here.
     
  4. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    43,515
    465
    486
    Dec 22, 2009
    What breed is it? With ducks growing so quickly that is quite a size difference.
     
  5. Betsih

    Betsih New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Sep 14, 2012
    Our original order was for 6 Pekins and 2 Buff Orpingtons. None of the ducklings were marked when they arrived and all looked to be the same color. Right now we are assuming the survivor is a Pekin. Lucky seems to be turning white as the adult feathers come in.

    The new babies will be 5 Pekin and 2 Buff.
     
  6. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,215
    140
    243
    Oct 31, 2009
    Somerville, AL
    Sorry about your first shipment.

    That will be quite a size difference. It would probably be safest to keep them seperated for at least a week of two that way they will have more stamina and will be a little bigger. You could try making something where they can see each other but not touch, like a partition in the brooder made from hardware cloth or chicken wire. You will need to monitor them when you do put them together so that Lucky doesn't pick on the little ones.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by