something wicked this way comes.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by justusnak, Aug 15, 2007.

  1. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    ok, I am guessing its the heat. My gals get good layer pellets...free range ALL day...get veggies in the heat of the day from the fridge, to cool them down, they have oyster shell free choice, and crushed egg shells about once or twice a week. Not sure whats going on here. Any advice?
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  2. Southern28Chick

    Southern28Chick Flew The Coop

    Apr 16, 2007
    Whoa, that's weird. I don't know. Hope someone can help you out soon. [​IMG]
     
  3. Varisha

    Varisha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 22, 2007
    Are the shells thin maybe?
     
  4. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    In the first pic, the shells are very thin...in the last 2 pics, NO shell....just membrane! Wierd.
     
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Deb, I think it's the heat myself. My girls' shells aren't like that, but they have gotten thinner, not rock hard like usual. I thought it was that they weren't eating the oyster shell, but now I'm convinced the extreme heat is playing a part.
     
  6. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    Thanks Cynthia......I am thinking the heat...I HOPE so...these are from my one yr old RIR and comets. I dont want to lose any of these gals. They lay the BEST eggs...usually.
     
  7. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    The ones that have thinner shells of my girls are also the ones over a year old. All the newbies who are laying have really hard little shells on their eggs. Maybe the older ones are having a harder time in the heat maintaining the right balance of fluids, etc.
     
  8. Southern28Chick

    Southern28Chick Flew The Coop

    Apr 16, 2007
    Quote:How are the temps in Indiana? I'm just wondering because I don't have eggs yet but next year in our 100 + heat I don't know how my eggs will be.
     
  9. wolfpack62001

    wolfpack62001 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 6, 2007
    New Brockton, Alabama
    I dont think its the heat, Im in Southern Alabama and its been 104 plus down here.
    My Hens are all new to laying and there nowhere near regular but there eggs are good and hard shelled.
    Maybe the feed? Ive never seen eggs like that.
    The only thing I can think of is Calciume, are you feeding layer feed?
    Hope this helps
     
  10. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    wolf, you said it-yours are new to laying. All mine who are new layers have tough shells, but my girls who are a year and a half old have shells that are just not as hard as they were. Deb and I are both feeding good quality feed plus crushed eggshells plus oyster shell. I do think the heat is playing a part with the older girls to some degree.
    **** I just found this abstract about the thin shells from heat stress. Here's the summary:

    Abstract
    1. The effect of high temperature on eggshell quality was investigated by measuring the mechanical and material properties of shell and membranes.

    2. Heat exposure resulted in a decrease in zootechnical performance and eggshell thickness, increase in egg breakage, and unchanged egg shape index.

    3. The static stiffness (Kstat), dynamic stiffness (Kdyn) and modulus of elasticity of the eggshell were not significantly affected by high temperature. Membrane prolongation increased significantly while membrane attachment strength and breakage strength tended to decrease and increase, respectively. The relationships between these variables were changed by high temperature.

    4. Neither Kstat nor Kdyn could give a reasonable explanation for the changed eggshell quality induced by heat stress. The decreased eggshell thickness and changed properties of shell membrane may be responsible, at least partially, for the decreased shell quality of eggs from heat-stressed hens.​
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2007

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