Spitzhaubens

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Andora, Apr 15, 2009.

  1. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

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  2. danceswithronin

    danceswithronin Crowing

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    How flighty are these guys generally?

    I almost ordered one for later this month and cancelled my order because I had several reputedly flighty breeds on my order and I decided to swap them out for some heavier, docile, low-fly breeds.

    I may still hatch out Spitzs for sale though.
     
  3. ketojenn

    ketojenn Crowing

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    Mine never leaves the yard and stays in the run unless I open the gate. She does like to forage in brush piles and is first to check out new stuff, but she doesn't stray. I have a little mosaic roo that likes to hop the fence and go on walkabout however.
     
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  4. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    I really like mine.

    They are way easier to keep in "bad" ratios. (2 male to 3 female) and noone gets torn up.

    Tend to be more friendly to chicks etc.
     
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  5. SueT

    SueT Crossing the Road

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    I don't consider the word 'flighty' meaning that they are good at flying. To me it means a bird is more easily startled into fleeing. Which is desirable for free range birds. I'd say my leghorns are more flighty that way, but they certainly don't fly. Spitzhaubens can be in-your-face friendly, and follow you around like a puppy if raised with lots of handling. I wanted mine to be good free rangers, so have been kind of hands off with them. I'd rather see them out in the field foraging than on the porch begging....
     
  6. danceswithronin

    danceswithronin Crowing

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    I mostly just don't want them unhappy from lack of ranging space, which I can't give them. They get a 13x13' run and that's it except for special field trips into the yard and garden when the dogs are put up. But since I have an in-ground pool even that makes me leery, they could easily drown.
     
  7. homeschoolin momma

    homeschoolin momma Songster

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    You have 2 hens and 1 cockerel.

    I raise spitzhaubens. If handled frequently they can be taught to be more calm to an extent. They do not struggle or fuss generally when handled, its just catching them that can be tricky. They do like to forage. A 13x13 run is pretty big and they would probably be ok in it, but would be happier with an open yard or pasture. They are pretty good with maintaining boundaries, mine seldom leave or crossover into our neighbors yard. When they were enclosed in a fenced pasture they also remained inside the confines of the fence, but were also easily able to fly over if they wanted to.
    I dont see them getting to close to the pool, they are pretty smart and stay away from large bodies of water. I have a large creek flowing through my property and they never go near it even though they could if they wanted to.
     
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  8. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Free Ranging

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    Mine are pretty friendly & fly more TO (greet) us than away. I live in a neighborhood & my Spitzes pretty much stay in the yard. They can & will fly over the garden fence to eat some bugs & broccoli. I even had a rooster fly to the top of the garage to eat the mulberries up there.

    The roosters are not aggressive, very attractive, take care of their hens, but crow. I'm more used to the big Orpingtons that really only crow a little bit in the mornings. I think the hens are also pretty. Who doesn't want a fun "Dalmation chicken" with a mohawk? My Spitz hen is pretty quiet and follows my son everywhere.
     
  9. SueT

    SueT Crossing the Road

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    I sold my last Spitzhaubens to an Amish couple who saw them in the yard, and stopped by to ask about them. They liked that the breed has a German name. I had lost the other Spitz hen last month, presumably to a predator, unless she is broody somewhere. But we have had a LOT of storms, and a foot of rain, so she would be up against great odds. Anyway they bought a hen and a rooster and want to raise Spitzes. I like to imagine that all the Amish in the area will eventually have some of these birds. Meanwhile, I saved 4 Spitz eggs and gave them to my newly broody Sebright, Moonshine. We shall see what happens with those.....she is 2 years old and very determined to be a mama, having gone broody every month during warm weather.
    a pair.jpg Broody day 1.jpg
     
  10. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    Good luck with the eggs.
     
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