starting a hatchery

Discussion in 'Chicken Breeders & Hatcheries' started by chickenman7, Mar 27, 2008.

  1. chickenman7

    chickenman7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How can I start my own mini-Hatchery? [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  2. MandyH

    MandyH You'll shoot your eye out!

    We started with a 12x12 shed we already had and ran electricity to it, insulated the ceiling and walls, then put up paneling. Then we added 2 GQF Sportsman incubators and a sportsman hatcher. We have 2 BIG troughs that hold 50-100 chicks and then a couple smaller ones that hold small amounts of turkeys and ducks. We also have an air condtioner installed and a heater. Total light bill EVERY month: $450-$650. Total amount of chickens sold: between $5 and $100. We also built three brooder boxes that are 6ftx3ftx2ft that are up on 3ft legs that the chicks go into outside after they don't need lights anymore. Well one of them is wrapped up and has two lights in there in case I run out of room in the hatching house and the overflow goes in the heated brooder box. These are made of treated wood, chicken wire and galvanized tin= not cheap. Plus the cost of feed is running us at least $600 a month. Total invested to get started: Incubators $1800, paneling, lumber, insulation: $200, wire, conduit etc to run power: $450, heat lamps, waterers, feeders etc: $100, AC:$180, heater:$75, and light bill $450-$650. Not to mention the cost of keeping the big birds that lay the eggs, the sweat and tears.
     
  3. Ace_king_brahma

    Ace_king_brahma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Castroville, Texas
    Quote:Yup, starting up one is alot of work. I started up with nothing more than a circulated hova-bator and egg turner. I hatched my own eggs, bought chicks at wholesale, and had broodies hatching for me. I can't even recall how much the entire operation ran me a month. I can say on an average I was making $100-$200 a month. I also had a scale and sold starter out of my bag by the pound.

    I have restarted and so far my bill has hit $2000+. New stock, new equipment, repairs to the building I used as my "showroom", feed and more. so far I've made back $124 back. But I've only been open 2 1/2 weeks. I sold out of chicks first week and now I have more stock in. It's hard work and expensive but if you hang in there and build a good rep with your local buyers it pays off. I have customers who remember me from 6 years ago and had been hoping I would get back into the biz. I wish you all the luck in your enterprise.
     
  4. Settin'_Pretty

    Settin'_Pretty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 10, 2008
    North Georgia
    Quote:May I ask why your electric is running so high?
    There's no way I can see it should be near that for where you are located, and a 12x12 building.
    I've seen people heat greenhouses for less in Georgia.
    I'm in Idaho right now and have a 3600 foot house that in the coldest of sub-zero months is less than $300 for both gas heat downstairs and electric heat upstairs.

    Also you said you have 2 sportsman's at $1800, those run around $550 new each.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2008
  5. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    Newman Lake, WA
    If you want to be a real hatchery. You probably would have to get NPIP certified and there are lots of rules you must follow.

    One of them is that incubators and brooding rooms must be seperate. They must be easily cleanable and no storage is allowed for one example.....

    Get some information from your state and from USDA.

    PS On the electricity question. I live just outside of Spokane, WA and my electric bill in the winter is around $500.00 in January and February. I live in a 2600 sq ft house. I have an incubator running usually a heat lamp and 2-3 small heaters in my chicken coops.......

    It just depends on what electricity runs in your neck of the woods.
     
  6. Settin'_Pretty

    Settin'_Pretty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 10, 2008
    North Georgia
    Is that $500 per month of Jan and Feb?
    I don't think the price of electricity can vary all that much since it's regulated.
    My elec. alone in the worst month is $150, now I have made it go higher from time to time being very wasteful and welding and such, but it's $150 in the coldest month with normal living.
    And then natural gas heat downstairs in $150 also.
    The electricity to my shop and 2 car garage is also in that.

    I guess we would need to look at KWH price and usage to get an idea, but to be honest with the cost of everything else, I don't see how people could survive paying that, plus a car payment, a house payment, gasoline to go to work, food, etc.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2008
  7. blue90292

    blue90292 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 30, 2007
    Rosharon, TX
    Settin'_Pretty :

    Is that $500 per month of Jan and Feb?
    I don't think the price of electricity can vary all that much since it's regulated.
    My elec. alone in the worst month is $150, now I have made it go higher from time to time being very wasteful and welding and such, but it's $150 in the coldest month with normal living.
    And then natural gas heat downstairs in $150 also.
    The electricity to my shop and 2 car garage is also in that.

    I guess we would need to look at KWH price and usage to get an idea, but to be honest with the cost of everything else, I don't see how people could survive paying that, plus a car payment, a house payment, gasoline to go to work, food, etc.

    electricity in texas is no longer regulated.....yay for texas, NOT.​
     
  8. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    Jan 18, 2008
    Newman Lake, WA
    In the summer it runs around $125.00 and we are on the cheaper supplier.....

    You also have to consider your weather. We go from 95-100 in the last summer to 0 - -5 in January and February.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2008
  9. MandyH

    MandyH You'll shoot your eye out!

    Settin Pretty I said I have 2 sportsman incubators and a sportsman hatcher. The shed is metal and to keep it between 78-80 degrees year round the ac or heater is running constantly. I also have a styrofoam incubator and 5-7 heat lamps on 24/7. I know after plugging up just one Sportsman incubator the light bill went up $90. Also, if no one around here sells Sportsman incubators, you have to add the cost of shipping in too. I would also like to know why you are questioning everything I have written? The man asked about starting a mini hatchery and I was just telling him what it cost US. You make it sound like I am lying and I do not appreciate it, I know exactly what it cost me because I am the one who worked and made the money to pay for it all. As to being able to pay all our bills and have all that too, my husband makes quite a lot of money. Any other questions please ask, but don't question what I have written because I wouldn't lie on here.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 28, 2008
  10. Mrs MIA

    Mrs MIA Chick Magnet

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    I suppose it all depends on what is meant by a "Mini-hatchery"... we have two homemade incubators that can do 100 quail or about 30 chicken eggs at a time (yes, I DO want one of the big Sportsman 'bators! [​IMG]) and plan on concentrating on just a few breeds to keep costs down. I will likely have around 150 birds. That might seem small, it might not. But everyone's startup costs are going to be different - it just depends on how far you want to take it. I can tell you MY DH is worried about electricity, because we can spend the entire month of January and some of February in the -20 to -30°F range, and heating an 8x8' and 12x20' building can get expensive. But we don't make money hand over fist - we are building up slowly as we have the funds, and maybe someday we can move beyond "backyard breeder" status, but for now it's enough. Look into other options for your area - solar/wind energy might be feasible, and more efficient in the long run.

    Don't get discouraged, though... it can be done. Just do a lot of planning up front, keep your eyes peeled for good deals on BYC, your local Craigslist.com, Ebay, etc... we've managed to save bundles of money on materials for the new building by watching the ads. [​IMG]

    Good luck, and keep us posted!
     

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