Starting Incubation have I killed my chickens already

Sam21

Hatching
7 Years
Sep 10, 2012
8
0
7
While setting up my incubator, I noticed that I was unable to get to a steady temperature of 99 degrees. It only stayed at 97 degrees and I figured that the temperature would go up since that was happening earlier. When i woke up, it dropped to 92 degrees and I figured that I should just increase the house temperature. It did work but my parents were against that I idea. After, I waited the next morning my temperature was at 83 degrees. I thought if I put pillows and a cloth inside the incubator it would help but it did nothing. My dad suggested that i put another light source in there. It worked and increased the temperature. A couple of hours on, the temperature was at 110 degrees. I shut off one of the light source and it brought the temperature down but it also brought the temperature to 95 degrees. I thought maybe I could turn the other light back on and adjust it because it had a dimmer switch. It put the temperature back to 110 degrees. Right know the weaker light source is off and is now at 99 degrees. Is it possible that my eggs are still capable of being alive? (Note:This is only 4 days of incubation.)
 

Roxannemc

Songster
7 Years
Mar 30, 2012
3,677
126
236
SE Missouri
Yes Thats pretty high but it sort of depends how long it was 110.
The egg takes a while to heat up and cool off.With eggs. ..dont count on all being dead.You never know.Day 7-10 candle them .See if anything moves or looks to have veins or just clear.The low temps may not have effected them too much
Higher is worse on them if its extended than low.
Let us know!!. GOOD LUCK!
 

Sam21

Hatching
7 Years
Sep 10, 2012
8
0
7
It's the 21st day and one chicken hatched. Its still in the incubator and I'm not sure when to put the chicken in a brooder. Also, will having the chicken in cardboard affects its footing. I just put some napkins in to help it out. I'm not sure if it helped.
 

RonC

Songster
7 Years
Feb 28, 2012
1,510
129
196
D/FW
The napkins or paper towels will provide more traction and be better for the little one than cardboard. Once it's dried off you can move it to a brooder at the righ temperature. 90-95 degrees F for the first week. Make sure it can get away from the heat also to regulate it's own body temp. Might add a stuffed animal or feather duster for the little one if alone.
 

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