Stop laying at What Age?

Domestic_goddess

Songster
10 Years
Mar 26, 2009
1,747
24
173
Utah
Generally it's about 3 years and then they start to slow down.....but I've heard that some can still lay even into 7 years or older.
Could this be a slow time because of winter or a molt?
 

6chickens in St. Charles

Songster
10 Years
Mar 25, 2009
1,533
42
181
St. Charles, IL
Yes, it seems slow for everybody in our coop. Lots of feathers around, too. She's been exhibiting rooster behaviors all her life, too. Even though she's been the broody one who hatched our 2 chicks, we HAVE watched her lay eggs, so we know she's a hen, she sometimes does the rooster dance, she sometimes crows and she sometimes chest butts our rooster. DH says maybe she's hormonally off.
 

Domestic_goddess

Songster
10 Years
Mar 26, 2009
1,747
24
173
Utah
Sounds like they are molting!...and she's probably the dominant female in the flock as well and that's why you see that kind of behaviour.
 

warren

Songster
12 Years
Sep 29, 2007
320
2
139
UK
My 4.5 year old hen died today. She laid 56 eggs last year. They were very large eggs. They seem to get bigger as the hen ages.
 

6chickens in St. Charles

Songster
10 Years
Mar 25, 2009
1,533
42
181
St. Charles, IL
Quote:
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I am sorry for your loss. I hope everybody else is ok!
 

Bo Garrett

Crowing
12 Years
Feb 19, 2009
538
251
258
I have a flock of about 200 large cochins (several varieties) with two 9 year old hens, 6 eight year old hens and another 12 or so over 7 years old and all are laying. When I originally got into large cochins years ago they didn't have very long life spans (3 years max) but now I have, with good management and selection, increased that by several years. They have long productive lives and I have shipped them all over the U.S. for others to enjoy.
Always seek birds from breeders who take seriously point number one in the Historical Introduction of the American Poultry Association's Standard of Perfection which states, "1. That in each breed, the most useful type should be made Standard type."
Birds that don't breed naturally, lay well or represent their standard description should be avoided. Many breeders are guilty of bigger or smaller is better thinking but if you hold to the standard you'll have the proper size, type and quality which leads to healthier, more vigorous birds that in turn will be longer lived.

Bo
 

teach1rusl

Love My Chickens
10 Years
Jul 28, 2009
10,017
175
356
Floyds Knobs, Indiana
My Coop
My Coop
Quote:
Wow...that is great that they're laying at those ages!
warren - sorry about your girl...an older girl, and she was still providing you and egg a week. Sounds like a faithful girl there
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Sorry you lost her.
 

6chickens in St. Charles

Songster
10 Years
Mar 25, 2009
1,533
42
181
St. Charles, IL
Quote:
Well, then my unstandard little bird is perfect for me! We like her for her company, her rat-fink personality, her "woooop wooop wip"ing at us. If she stops laying eggs that will be fine. She is not as beautiful as other rosecomb bantams I've seen in pictures, in fact I got her from a kid at a show, all he knew was "her granddad was the grand champion crower at the state fair", and maybe she's not so beautiful because she eats junk half the time instead of the nice purina feed she's given, not being raised by showbird quality people. So, thank you for the standard of perfection information. I am hardly a perfect person, she is a fine little imperfect pet for me.
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MANNA-PRO

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