Sulfamethazine Sodium Question

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by rhino533, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. rhino533

    rhino533 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 21, 2011
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    My flock was suffering from runny bloody poop believed to be caused by e-coli bacteria. I've been treating them using Sulfamethazine Sodium for the last 6days (today is the last day of treatment). Each day using less Sulfamethazine Sodium. They all seem much better and I haven't seen any bloody poop in the last few days. My question is I just found out you shouldn’t use it in Egg laying chickens. Well of course my chickens are egg layers and I need to know the side effects if will have on them. How long after I stop treatment can I start eating the eggs again? And will it permanently cause infertile eggs? Or just for a certain time period? There was a bit of a language barrier problem that's why I didn't know you shouldn’t use this treatment on egg layers. Any info you can provide would be greatly appreciated. I haven't eaten any eggs since I started treatment.

    Thanks!!
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Jacksonville, Florida
    Sulfamethazine sodium is sulmet. There is a 10 day withdrawal after last dosing. Excessive dosage may cause toxic reactions. Dont try hatching eggs during medication and for short periods thereafter. Sulmet treats 2 types of cocci (there are 9 types of cocci that chickens can get, that's why Corid is normally recommended and there is no withdrawal.)
    Sulmet also treats coryza, acute fowl cholera, and salmonella pullorum.
    I've dealt with E Coli. It causes yellow/green diarrhea, birds are lethargic and wont eat. All chickens have E Coli, it's when it gets out of control in their system is when it becomes a problem, stress can cause it to happen. Cocci are protozoa, E Coli are bacteria. Baytril in combination with probiotics and poultry nutri drench IF caught early will bring the E Coli back under control. Continued treatment with probiotics will rebuild good bacteria, bringing it all back in balance. Caught too late, E Coli will eventually kill a chicken. Good luck.
     
  3. rhino533

    rhino533 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks so much for your response. It answered all my questions. THANKSSS!!
     
  4. flowerchild59

    flowerchild59 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you read though my posting on my signature line, You will see why worming chickens is so important. I would get some valbazen and treat them. Everytime an intestinal parasite attaches to the lining of the gut they make little tears and hemorrhages that make easy access for gut bacteria, which will get out of kilter when they have a weakened immune system from the parasites. So worm them, repeat and then get them on a routine worming schedule. Lots of details in my link.
     

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