Sweeter Heater Vs. Flat panel heater

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by wiss0023, Sep 10, 2010.

  1. wiss0023

    wiss0023 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 1, 2010
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    I have seen various older posts on these two forms of heat, after reading product reviews I am curious . . . how have these products worked for you over time? If you have used both, which do you prefer (quality/durability/heat/price to run etc.)? I have a 5 x 3 coop, and live in WI. Thanks Much!!!
     
  2. wiss0023

    wiss0023 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 1, 2010
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    I see Sweeter Heater is from WI . . .
     
  3. wiss0023

    wiss0023 Out Of The Brooder

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    The flat panel heater I am considering is the eco-heater 602 (the reviews on the 100 watt version seemed like it didn't kick out enough heat) - however even this heater has numerous negative reviews on cracking on the unit after one year of use. The Sweeter Heater looks like it may be better quality, but the 11 x 30 unit is only listed to heat an 11 x 30 area? Seems like it might not have the guff for -20 degree weather in WI? Not that I want it to be hot in the coop, but just above freezing. I know I'm talking to myself here, but I know eventually someone will jump in [​IMG]
     
  4. Schultz

    Schultz CluckN'Crow Farm

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    Sorry, No experience with either product here. I am in the process of converting a 4x6 wood playhouse into a coop for a new breed addition. I am insulating it and not sure about heat source quite yet myself. I was thinking of useing a ceramic heat emitter that screws into a light bulb socket and maybe a heated waterer base. Between having an insulated coop, the chickens body heat, and a couple of little heat sources I am hoping this will be sufficient. This my first experience with a small coop, I use a oil filled electric radiator for the big walk in coop and it keeps it plenty warm maybe even too warm if I let it. At one point last winter the big coop was like 60 degrees. I turned it down so that it stayed about 40. Egg production was good though! [​IMG] It doen't stay as cold or for as long down here in Indiana but I am familier with Wisconsin COLD. I was born in Appleton and lived there for part of my childhood. Wish I could help you more but if I were you I'd insulate if you can swing it. [​IMG]
     
  5. HarryBun12

    HarryBun12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I used the flat panel (some silly name like Kozy Legs- made for under an office desk) in my 4X3' coop last winter. I only turned it on when it got below 20 degrees and it just took the edge off, which was just fine. I didnt' want it to get too warm in the coop or else the chickens wouldn't go out in the run. Last year I had three bantams that I worried would get too cold. Not sure how much I'll turn it on this winter since I have standard sized girls now. I like that it was flat to the wall and since it didnt' get too warm I didn't feel there was any hazard to worry about. That Sweeter Heater looks interesting and I like the idea that it's made here, too. Be sure to post on here what you choose and how you like it, okay?
     
  6. The Sheriff

    The Sheriff Overrun With Chickens

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    I have both and love them both. I used the flat panel heater in the big (7x7) coop with a thermocube. It turned on at 35 degrees and off at 45 degrees. Sometimes on cold rainy days I would turn it on and the chickens would come in out of the cold and sit in front of it. I used the sweeter heater in a 2 story breeder coop (4x4) when I had juveniles in it over the winter. It worked great. I just raised it up higher as they got bigger and needed less heat. Dh thinks the flat panel heater is more efficient as you can mount it low and the heat rises. The sweeter heater hangs above the birds.
     
  7. kickinchicken

    kickinchicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just went on both sites and the Sweeter Heater does offer a side mount model so this might be just as efficient as the Cozy Legs if you can mount it to the lower part of the coop. I like the sweeter heater as it is made for animal use and seems a bit sturdier than the Cozy Legs. I will be getting this after I recover from $2,000 in vet bills, a $900 water bill and my 3 year old's birthday party [​IMG]
     
  8. wiss0023

    wiss0023 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 1, 2010
    Wisconsin
    Thank you for your posts . . . very helpful. My coop is 3-5 and would need a "side mount" version of the sweeter heater (the roosting bar is too close to the peak of the roof) . . . I am curious Warden which you think throws out more heat. I Live in WI and it can get -20 to -30 degrees here in the dead of winter. I am really just looking for something to take the edge off and keep it above 20 degrees in the coop, but don't want to spend the money on something that will only take a coop from 0 - 5 degrees. How long have you had both models, and do they show one to be more durable? Thanks again for your responses!!!
     
  9. wiss0023

    wiss0023 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 1, 2010
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    Quote:I think you may be onto something, as the ratings on the cozy legs had some comments on cracking etc. But it is cheaper?
     
  10. Rare Feathers Farm

    Rare Feathers Farm Overrun With Chickens

    I have a fully insulated coop (walls, ceiling) it's an 8' w x 16' L and I use about 6" of litter (pine shavings) in there.

    In extreme cold, I use flattened cardboard boxes over all of the pop doors to lock them in. I also have a 250watt (red) light that is plugged into a thermocube and a 100watt clamp lamp above my Houdan pen (roost) that's on all of the time (in the winter months).

    At one point last year, I had the coop all closed up and two 250w red heat lamps blaring for about 2 weeks...that kept it at 16-20 degrees inside when it was below zero outside.

    My bantams are in "bins" above the rest of the coops for the winter months and it's warmer near the ceiling for them.

    My other coop (still in progress) is a 4' x 6' and I'll insulate if I have the money/time but more than likely, it will not be insulated or heated. The way my larger coop is set up--if I have to, I can have chickens in the main feed room portion and store my feed in the garbage cans outside and in the tack shed--so if the weather really gets nasty, that's a last resort. My ducks/geese are in 16' x 16' pens with 4'x4' run in sheds. They have deep straw and a covered (top & 3.5 sides) shelter but that's it. I give them water in the mornings and at night.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2010

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