Swollen Eye & depressed (w/pic)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by southernpriss, Jun 3, 2012.

  1. southernpriss

    southernpriss In the Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2011
    Hey Yall this is ButterCup she is a 3 months old yesterday evening I went to check to make sure everyone got to bed ok and I notice she was perched on a small board at the bottom of the coop not up on the roosting poles with everyone else so when I picked her up I noticed there was no food in her crop.
    Today when I went to check on her and she was still up on the roost by herself. she seems depressed she is on the bottom of the pecking order so I brought her out of the chick yard with her favorite friend and made sure she has plenty of food, greens and water and she ate but not enough to fill her crop. this evening I brought her inside to give her some poly vi and feed her an egg. and I noticed one of her eyes is puffy and had some crust in it.
    I cleaned it out with some saline and put some neo on it. she is currently in sleeping in my inside cage. oh and I am happy to report her poop looked normal. I wouldn't be so concerned if she didn't seem so depressed. any ideas I watch my birds very close. but I am still new I only have about 2 years experience.
    any advice would be greatly appreciated.


    The Puffy Eye after I cleaned it out.
    [​IMG]

    Her other eye
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  2. She isn't getting really beat up, is she? It could be, like, a bug bite or something on her eye. I had the same thing on MY eye last week.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2012
  3. southernpriss

    southernpriss In the Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2011
    No not beat up she is bullied some she normally stays out of the way. I hope its just a bug bite just worried about her not eating much and acting depressed. :(
     
  4. spider, mosqito, tick, it could be several things.
     
  5. southernpriss

    southernpriss In the Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2011
    Here eye is bigger this morning it is mainly in the lower lid and she has her tail down and is not acting well any ideas????
     
  6. Any of these fit?
    Eye Disorders of the chicken​

    J.P. Jacob, G.D. Butcher and F.B. Mather2
    Eye disorders are not generally prevalent in poultry on a flock basis. However, as birds rely heavily on their sense of sight to carry on their daily activities, an increased incidence of eye problems can result in decreased flock performance. A visually impaired bird is at a major disadvantage in competing for food, water, and social position in a population of birds.

    Ammonia Toxicity

    The most common eye irritant in intensive animal production systems is ammonia gas (NH 3 ). Ammonia gas is extremely irritating to the membranes that line the eyelids, eyes, sinuses and trachea. Conjunctivitis is inflammation of the conjunctiva (membranes that line the eyelids) and the exposed sclera (white part of the eye). Affected birds have reddened, swollen eyelids, and are sensitive to and avoid light. If high ammonia levels persist, the cornea, the outermost part of the front of the eyeball, becomes ulcerated and blindness may occur.
    Ammonia gas is a bacterial breakdown product produced when uric acid from poultry manure combines with water forming a suitable environment for bacterial growth. Bacterial growth, and the resulting NH 3 production, is also dependent upon litter or manure pH and temperature.
    In intensive production systems, high levels of ammonia gas buildup are associated with inadequate ventilation. Ammonia is not typically a problem for birds raised in extensive or semi-extensive systems.

    Marek's Disease

    Marek's disease is a viral disease of chickens resulting in a type of cancer. Tumors developing in nerves cause lameness and paralysis. Tumors can also occur in the iris (segmented membrane behind the cornea perforated by the pupil) and cause irregular shaped pupils and blindness.
    Chicks can be vaccinated at the hatchery. While the vaccination is effective in preventing formation of tumors, it does not prevent infection by the virus. Recent studies have shown that conventional Marek's disease vaccines may not prevent formation of tumors in the eye.

    Avian Pox

    Avian pox is a viral disease that affects many types of birds. Fowl pox primarily affects chickens and turkeys. Pigeon pox affects pigeons, chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese. Canary pox infects canaries, chickens, sparrows, and probably other species.
    Pox is characterized by raised, blister-like lesions that develop on unfeathered areas (head, legs, vent, etc.) of the bird. If the lesions are around the eyes, then swelling may occur with impairment of eyesight and possibly blindness in severe cases. Ordinarily, the eyeball itself remains unaffected and, once lesions are resolved, eyesight should return to normal.

    Bacterial Infections

    A number of bacterial infections can lead to damage of the eye. Salmonella bacteria, particularly Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella arizona , are known to cause severe purulent conjunctivitis and ophthalmitis (inflammation of the eyeball and conjunctiva with pus) and blindness. Often young birds acquire the infections from the hen or through navel or yolk sac infections.
    Fungal Infections

    Molds readily grow on a number of different materials, including poultry feed and litter. A common mold is Aspergillus . Birds can be exposed to Aspergillus or other fungi in the hatchery, or more commonly in poorly dried litter. While Aspergillus is usually considered a respiratory tract pathogen, it can also invade the brain and eye. Yellow plaques develop and can be found under the eyelid. The eye becomes inflamed and severe damage can occur.
    Respiratory Infections

    A number of respiratory diseases can cause conjunctivitis, including Newcastle disease, laryngotracheitis, infectious bronchitis, chlamydia, and mycoplasma. These infections do not damage the eye itself, but cause the bird discomfort, leading to rubbing and scratching of the eyelids. Permanent eye injury with these conditions is rare. However, sinusitis can develop, causing swelling of the sinus under the eyelid and adding to bird discomfort.
    Nervous System Disorders

    Avian encephalomyelitis virus normally causes disease in chickens 1-6 weeks of age. The virus primarily affects the nervous system. Affected chicks show a dull expression of the eyes, followed by progressive incoordination, sitting on hocks, tremors of the head and neck, and finally paralysis or prostration. In adult birds previously infected as chicks, the virus can cause cataracts and general eye enlargement. The lens of the eye becomes fragmented and can no longer function properly to focus images.
    Nutrional Deficiencies

    Certain vitamin deficiencies, such as vitamin A and vitamin E, can result in damage to the eye. Vitamin A is necessary for the production of visual pigment of the retina and for maintenance of the lining of the tear ducts. Vitamin E is necessary for maintenance of the lens protein in the developing embryo. Vitamin E is passed from the breeder hen to the egg. If the breeder is receiving inadequate vitamin E in the diet, the embryo will suffer from a vitamin E deficiency and possible blindness. Vitamin deficiencies are rare when commercial poultry feeds are used.
    Developmental Disorders

    Congenital abnormalities in the formation and placement of the eye and eye socket occur, but the incidence is low. Abnormalities seen include one or both eyes missing, eyes reduced in size or placed forward on the head. These abnormalities may be hereditary or may be due to improper pre-incubation or incubation conditions. Affected chicks are usually culled at the hatchery.
    Cataracts

    A high incidence of cataracts can occur in flocks with vitamin E deficiency, avian encephalomyelitis infection, or continuous exposure to some types of artificial lighting.
    Trauma

    Injury to the eye and surrounding structures can occur in the hatchery, during transportation to the farm, or on the farm by poorly maintained equipment. Bright, shiny eyes can be an attractive target for picking by flock mates. Most chicks, however, are very adept at protecting their heads so that eye injury due to picking is rarely a problem.
     
  7. southernpriss

    southernpriss In the Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2011
    Thanks for all the info animallover... I guess it really could be anything. it has blood spots around the lid now.. I noticed her scratching at it. she may be making it worse. I am leaning towards malnutrition from the other birds bullying her I have 12 birds right now with 3 feeders. when I bring her out of the chicken yard with just me she perks up and her tail stands up but when I let her go be with her friends she puts her tail down? I have never had one that didn't want to be with the flock.
     
  8. Make sure there isn't a hay seed or anything in it.
     
  9. Firefighter Chick

    Firefighter Chick Songster

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    May 8, 2011
    Southeast Minnesota
    Looks like the tissue surrounding the eye is swollen which makes the eye itself look depressed. It could really be anything that causes it, allergic reaction, infection, disease. I am thinking maybe it is an injury that got infected. Does the chicken have any respiratory problems also? Sometimes respiratory issues manifest in the eyes in the form of swelling. If she's not showing other symptoms, I would monitor the eye to make sure it's not getting worse. Take more picturse if the eye gets worse and some other people on here may give some more detailed instructions. She's pretty, by the way.
     
  10. southernpriss

    southernpriss In the Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2011
    Ok thank you! She doesn't have any respiratory problems yesterday she was sleeping
    Standing up just seemed exhausted. She hasn't been running for treats lately. she seems happiest when she is isolated I have antibiotics in her water just to be safe she seems a little better today and def seems to perk up after getting some polyvi. I am just scared I might miss something. I will post more pictures of her eye when I get home from work! Thanks again
     

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