terramyacin crumbles

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mastiffsinky, Nov 1, 2008.

  1. mastiffsinky

    mastiffsinky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 9, 2008
    Bremen, Ky
    what is the upside and downside to using these?

    Katie
     
  2. CUDA

    CUDA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 4, 2008
    Michigan
    In my opinion, terramycin is good for nothing no matter what the label says, except treating for very minor infections...
     
  3. Pumpkinpup

    Pumpkinpup Poultry Princess

    Jul 16, 2008
    North-West Georgia
    It's ok if you have a mild problem but for anything very serious, Tylan has been much more affective from my experience!
     
  4. dospuercos

    dospuercos Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 23, 2008
    Lehi, UT
    I am glad you posted this question. I have an old cowboy friend that gives the crumbles to all his horses every year when the weather changes. He swears that it helps them so that they don't get a runny nose or cough every year. He feeds it to them 5 weeks on 7 weeks off. He has also given it to sick cows with great success. He told me to give it to my rooster since he was recently attacked by another rooster & had his eye injured badly. He told me it would help fight any infection he might get. And would also help my hens since the weather is changing. But I am wondering if I can give it to my hens because I don't know if it will pass through into their eggs. Does anyone have any information on this???? Also how much & for how long should I give it to them if I can???
     
  5. mypicklebird

    mypicklebird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 8, 2008
    Sonoma Co, CA
    Terramycin is an antibiotic. Antibiotics are for treating bacterial infections. Terramycin has a spectrum that covers SOME bacterial infections. Does nothing for viruses, and does nothing for many common bacteria that cause disease. Many chickens carry chronic mycoplasma, which terramycin has some efficacy for- but you can't generally cure it, only suppress it.

    Adding antibiotics to the feed or water because of changes in the weather has no basis in sound medicine. It would be akin to me running to the GP or pediatrician and asking for some antibiotic because a storm is coming.

    Wonder why Terramycin is not working as well as it used to? Maybe because it is available over the counter at the local feed store to every cowboy, farmer or pet owner who gives it to their pet(s) at the first sign of a sniffle. Ore even worse- gives it as a preventative? Good husbandry and sometimes vaccines are/is the preventative, drugs are for treating existing known disease.

    Please think about what you are doing in the grand scheme of things before you add more probably unneeded antibiotics into the food chain.

    As for drug residues- if you read the bag, it probably says for use in meat birds of a certain age, maybe with a withdrawal of 10-14 days. It probably also says not for use in laying hens. Period. Published withdrawal time does not exist, meaning withdrawal time of life.
     
  6. Sahara

    Sahara Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 22, 2008
    Keystone Heights, FL
    I have three week old chicks and all are starting to get runny eyes. It started with one having a wart and it scratched it off and now most (I have 15 in all) have at least one runny eye. Would you recommend giving them Terramycin in their water?
     
  7. spook

    spook Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't know about the crumbles, but often feed and weather changes with the types of foods available, possibly getting damp and we all know wet feed will make critters ill. Most people that I know of give their stock a tonic with winter and spring.

    I have had great success with the use of Terramycin and so far have not needed anything beyond. It has worked well with respiratory issues, sulmet for cocci. So far So good.

    Good luck to you on your choice. I agree with the over use of antibiotics, yet there is a fine line between not doing anything and catching it and treating a illness.
     

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