Texas A&M Coturnix quail just started crowing... at 4 months old

Rooapalooza

Songster
Aug 7, 2019
220
667
162
Texas
Hey everyone! I bought a few Texas A&M Coturnix as chicks in October. They are healthy but never laid any eggs, so I assumed they are either 1) all boys or 2) not getting enough light. However, they never crowed either, until last week. Now I have three or four crowers (it's hard to catch them doing it). Why did the crowing take so long? Do they crow less when there are other males around? Does light affect their crowing as well? Do they crow to look for mates? Will they form pairs if they are all males? Are they just now crowing because the days are getting longer?

They are on high protein game bird feed with oyster shell just in case. They are outside in a large cage. I probably should have looked into this before, but it's been a busy time of year, and like I said, they are otherwise healthy. I've had coturnix quail before and didn't have this issue, although they were easy to sex on sight. I refuse to vent sex for the sake of everyone's dignity :). At this point I'm assuming they are all boys, which is fine with me since they are not injuring each other.
 

mixedUPturk

Loves Hatching
May 28, 2015
4,661
16,397
922
South LA
Hey everyone! I bought a few Texas A&M Coturnix as chicks in October. They are healthy but never laid any eggs, so I assumed they are either 1) all boys or 2) not getting enough light. However, they never crowed either, until last week. Now I have three or four crowers (it's hard to catch them doing it). Why did the crowing take so long? Do they crow less when there are other males around? Does light affect their crowing as well? Do they crow to look for mates? Will they form pairs if they are all males? Are they just now crowing because the days are getting longer?

They are on high protein game bird feed with oyster shell just in case. They are outside in a large cage. I probably should have looked into this before, but it's been a busy time of year, and like I said, they are otherwise healthy. I've had coturnix quail before and didn't have this issue, although they were easy to sex on sight. I refuse to vent sex for the sake of everyone's dignity :). At this point I'm assuming they are all boys, which is fine with me since they are not injuring each other.
They will injure each other soon. You have to seperate out those extra males asap. Sit and watch if you wont lift their skirts. the hens wont lay much til theyre gone either, stress from overbreeding even if your not seeing it. although you may get an egg or two here and there soon that does Not mean its okay. A&M are extra touchy and if you dont do anything yhe results may be terrible. im sorry but i have personally walked out to a sudden blood bath. The usual injury is a scalping or bloody eye but with A&M i bet the contrast of the red blood is too attractive to just leave it alone. They are beggining to crow because of the light. It had sort of stunted the hormone growth aspect thats why they didnt start sooner. They cant get the hormones so they dont breed or lay with lower light levels. A&M are coturnix, just a different color and they will not form pairs but coveys because they are domesticated away from those instincts.
 

Rooapalooza

Songster
Aug 7, 2019
220
667
162
Texas
They will injure each other soon. You have to seperate out those extra males asap. Sit and watch if you wont lift their skirts. the hens wont lay much til theyre gone either, stress from overbreeding even if your not seeing it. although you may get an egg or two here and there soon that does Not mean its okay. A&M are extra touchy and if you dont do anything yhe results may be terrible. im sorry but i have personally walked out to a sudden blood bath. The usual injury is a scalping or bloody eye but with A&M i bet the contrast of the red blood is too attractive to just leave it alone. They are beggining to crow because of the light. It had sort of stunted the hormone growth aspect thats why they didnt start sooner. They cant get the hormones so they dont breed or lay with lower light levels. A&M are coturnix, just a different color and they will not form pairs but coveys because they are domesticated away from those instincts.
Thanks! It's not a problem to separate them... so far I only know of two crowers for certain. I keep confusing one of them for another so that's why I sometimes think three, but I'm pretty sure it's two. If there are other males, will they not crow because there are crowing males present? Good to know on the light and hormones. I knew it affected egg production but I had never heard of it affecting crowing and aggression.

If I'm going to separate them into groups, I'd like to separate them with their preferred friends. Should I tag them to see who they like to hang out with the most?

There are 11 total in a 30 ft2 area right now. I have a couple small pallets on the ground so they can hang out on two levels. In other words there's a lot of places for them to run and hide, which might be helping with the fighting.
 

mixedUPturk

Loves Hatching
May 28, 2015
4,661
16,397
922
South LA
Thanks! It's not a problem to separate them... so far I only know of two crowers for certain. I keep confusing one of them for another so that's why I sometimes think three, but I'm pretty sure it's two. If there are other males, will they not crow because there are crowing males present? Good to know on the light and hormones. I knew it affected egg production but I had never heard of it affecting crowing and aggression.

If I'm going to separate them into groups, I'd like to separate them with their preferred friends. Should I tag them to see who they like to hang out with the most?

There are 11 total in a 30 ft2 area right now. I have a couple small pallets on the ground so they can hang out on two levels. In other words there's a lot of places for them to run and hide, which might be helping with the fighting.
Yes they will submit and not crow if there are stronger more dominant roos present. They also wont grow to their full potential plus sometimes the dominant one will block the lesser from eating.

I guess you could tag which ones seem to hang out and do it that way but you need to do it fast. Always have Blu - Kote on hand in case there is an injury.

Its really great they have so much room and yes i def think its helped keep them safe from eachother --able to hide from the bullies.

I think youve done a good job growing them out and now its time to weed out the extra males. You want each roo to have about 5 hens or else they will over mate the hens. So i would figure out the best roo and just eat the extras male(s?)
 
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