The Buckeye Thread

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Happy Chooks, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. knittychickadee

    knittychickadee Chillin' With My Peeps

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  2. buffalogal

    buffalogal Chillin' With My Peeps

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  3. cgmccary

    cgmccary Chillin' With My Peeps

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    nevermind
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2014
  4. slfarms

    slfarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In the past few years I've viewed buckeyes both on actual farms and in photographs. There seems to be variations in head width. Why is that?
     
  5. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    I too like that color, similar to BBR females. I have some bantam Wyandottes with that coloration from PartridgeXChocolate/Khaki. VERY pretty!
     
  6. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    You will see variation in head width in most breeds. The real question is what is the desirable width and how does that relate to the rest of the bird. In my experience, if you want a good breadth overall in your bird, then go for the wider head for this carries through the bird. Narrow heads translate to narrower body, which in the Buckeye is not desirable. Going back to what I posted earlier quoting Nettie Metcalf's overall vision of the breed is a "modified Cornish appearance". Looking at a Cornish (I don't mean those skinny and narrow hatchery birds either), you can clearly see, they are a wide bird. Therefore, the Buckeye should follow suit in have good width throughout. However, unlike the Cornish that narrows quickly at the tail and has a very short and narrow tail (comparatively), the Buckeye's tail should have a smooth transition from back to tail so as to not appear too fluffy at the base, nor too pinched.
     
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  7. homeworkin

    homeworkin Out Of The Brooder

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    I do have one hatchery Delaware very young hen I can work with and one adult Buckeye roo. I can move her into the Buckeye coop and see what I get. Pretty sure she is laying but not sure how often. So, is a Delaware considered barred even though she is mostly white? Eventually I'll have some Dels that are better stock. They just hatched last week. Looks like 3 boys 4 girls.
     
  8. slfarms

    slfarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Delewares wouldn't be considered barred. Barred would be your doms, barred rocks etc.
    Breeds that exhibit actual color pattern in a line(bar). I believe the white would mask the sex link.
     
  9. AinaWGSD

    AinaWGSD Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You're right. Sorry, it's been a while since I reviewed the genetics behind sex-links and since none of the barred breeds ever really piqued my interest I am not the most knowlegeable about which is barred and which is not. To me, delawares look like barred columbian. However, a buckeye rooster over a delaware hen should still produce sex-link chicks. They would be red sex links though, not black sex links.

    There is a very thorough thread regarding the genetics behind sex-links in the sticky section of Breeds, Genetics, & Showing.
     
  10. AinaWGSD

    AinaWGSD Chillin' With My Peeps

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    At 16 weeks, that's beyond doubt a pullet. There are a few feathers that seem "droopy," but none of them are pointed. All of the saddle and hackle feathers are very round. I have noticed sometimes on my buckeye pullets they do get a few feathers that seem long and droopy for females, but they've all turned out to be pullets. At 16 weeks, the cockerels are usually larger than the pullets, if not heavier. We processed several 6 month old pullets a few weeks ago, and I was quite impressed with how compact and well rounded the breasts were compared to the cockerels from the same hatch. For me, shank thickness is just too subjective. I'm always being fooled by thicker legs if I go by that alone.
     

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