The Bunny Chat Thread - For Bunny Owners

orloffer

Crowing
Jun 10, 2020
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SF Bay Area, CA
Red eyes shouldn't change anything much. It could just be that being outdoors isn't as comfy and they're not excited by what's there. They could be scared and don't wanna move. Rabbits are skittish - they're prey animals after all. Everything tries to eat them.
Good point--I might try letting them outside in the evening, as you suggested. My more skittish rabbit might be hard to catch, though, even if he is in a dog exercise pen.
Do you think it is a problem to let them out in the same area in which the chickens go? The chickens haven't been let out lately, but I am worried that it could present a health issue for the rabbits if they eat the grass the chickens walked all over.
 
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ChocolateMouse

Free Ranging
7 Years
Jul 29, 2013
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😬 Uhhh. Well. I know some people who have had success long-term with keeping chickens and rabbits in the same space.

I also know rabbits are very sensitive to diseases, parasites, medications and other conditions chickens just blow off. I also-also know layer feed is not good for rabbits.

I don't put my bunnies on grass that has had chickens on it regularly or in the last month for those reasons, but I think this is an individual risk assessment thing. You know your chickens, weather conditions, etc, better than me. Like if your chickens went out, it stormed for a few days, then dried out a lot for a week, that's much safer than a consistently muddy location that hasn't had chickens in a few weeks.
 

EverythingDucks

Crowing
May 7, 2020
1,588
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Clearwater, Florida
I wish I could do that with my rabbits! But we are all highly allergic to them, and they would probably get lost or stepped on. Our house is far from rabbit-proof.
It could be the timothy hay. I'm really allergic to it. My eyes will get all puffy and I'll sneeze non stop. I'm only a little bit allergic to rabbits. Switching to orchard grass may help. It's not dusty and it doesn't make me sneeze at all. Also, wearing a mask, clothes that hair doesn't stick to, and being outside when grooming helps a lot.

Mine are kind of litter trained, but I still find poop in places where it shouldn't be, even in their food containers sometimes. The Dutch rabbit used to have a problem where he would get his pee on himself, and even now he doesn't always pee in the litter box
Having them fixed makes a huge difference. If they aren't already I would do this. Lennon the Bunny has a few videos on litter training that may help. Having the litter box set up right is important too.

Does anyone else have rabbits who do not like certain treats or toys? One of my rabbits will not eat apple & banana flavored treats, and neither of them like those toys that have blocks of wood and plastic rings and bells
Some rabbits are just picky. Having good quality treats and toys helps. You may want to get them new ones and rotate the toys to keep it interesting.
 

locoyosh

Songster
6 Years
Mar 6, 2014
51
114
124
Lehigh Valley, PA
I would get a male and a female.
If your getting them as pets I would avoid getting a hutch. They cannot regulate their own body temperature and can get very overheated, which can lead to many issues. Though they do much better in the cold, it's something to be aware of.
They are also vulnerable to predators. They could have a heart attack even if the animal doesn't touch them.
Hutches don't provide enough space as well. Especially for two. Even the large ones. Rabbits need room to exercise and do zoomies around the house.
Which is why I strongly recommend free roaming indoors.
All it takes is some inexpensive bunny proofing. Much cheaper and easier than building a hutch. Your rabbits will be much happier and healthier too. If you have other pets they can get along if you introduce them properly. Some dogs do have a high prey drive, but you can setup babybgates, or playpen gates, to block off areas that your dog and rabbit cant cross. You can also setup a large playpen as a home-base for them. It could be as simple as a dog exercise pen. I would get one about 10ft long, but the bigger the better. Be sure to give them at least 4 hours of free roaming time for exercise, and mental stimulation. If you have other pets that don't get along with the rabbits, you can setup the gates so the rabbits can exercise without the risk of getting hurt.
If your worried an about their poop and pee, you can easily litter train them.
I would get a large hooded cat litter box. The litter pans are just to small. Fill it up with hay, with a bit of litter. Don't use cat litter, it has clay that kill the rabbits if ingested.
I'm just finishing my article on free roaming rabbits and rabbit care if your interested.

Lennon The Bunny is a YouTuber that's has lots of great info on keeping rabbits as pets. She has things on grooming, diet, setup, bunny proofing, and more
Thank you for taking the time to reply. I appreciate your advice, but having bunnies in the house doesn't work for everyone. My husband built us a great, predator proofed chicken coop and run and he'll do the same for our bunnies. We're planning on a 24-35 square foot hutch with an 8 x 8 movable run for playtime. We're also getting leashes so we can take them for walks in the yard. I feel confident that we will be able to provide a happy life for them even though they will be living outside. Isn't that their natural habitat anyway?
 

orloffer

Crowing
Jun 10, 2020
2,011
8,996
323
SF Bay Area, CA
😬 Uhhh. Well. I know some people who have had success long-term with keeping chickens and rabbits in the same space.

I also know rabbits are very sensitive to diseases, parasites, medications and other conditions chickens just blow off. I also-also know layer feed is not good for rabbits.

I don't put my bunnies on grass that has had chickens on it regularly or in the last month for those reasons, but I think this is an individual risk assessment thing. You know your chickens, weather conditions, etc, better than me. Like if your chickens went out, it stormed for a few days, then dried out a lot for a week, that's much safer than a consistently muddy location that hasn't had chickens in a few weeks.
Hmm...then maybe it isn't the best idea. I could let them (one at a time) into an outdoor area with cement on the ground, though.
It could be the timothy hay. I'm really allergic to it. My eyes will get all puffy and I'll sneeze non stop. I'm only a little bit allergic to rabbits. Switching to orchard grass may help. It's not dusty and it doesn't make me sneeze at all. Also, wearing a mask, clothes that hair doesn't stick to, and being outside when grooming helps a lot.


Having them fixed makes a huge difference. If they aren't already I would do this. Lennon the Bunny has a few videos on litter training that may help. Having the litter box set up right is important too.


Some rabbits are just picky. Having good quality treats and toys helps. You may want to get them new ones and rotate the toys to keep it interesting.
I wish it were only the timothy hay, but all the people in my family are allergic to fur and feathers. Non hypo-allergenic dogs, cats, yes, even chickens...
Both rabbits are fixed.
I think they prefer toys like pieces of cardboard, wicker toys, and empty paper towel rolls.

Thank you both for your responses!
 

EverythingDucks

Crowing
May 7, 2020
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Clearwater, Florida
Thank you for taking the time to reply. I appreciate your advice, but having bunnies in the house doesn't work for everyone. My husband built us a great, predator proofed chicken coop and run and he'll do the same for our bunnies. We're planning on a 24-35 square foot hutch with an 8 x 8 movable run for playtime. We're also getting leashes so we can take them for walks in the yard. I feel confident that we will be able to provide a happy life for them even though they will be living outside. Isn't that their natural habitat anyway?
Domestic rabbits and wild rabbits are very different. Wild rabbits will have a much much easier time living outside, whereas domestic rabbits won't. It's like the difference between dogs and wolves.
Lennon the Bunny has some great videos explaining why better than I can.
May I ask why keeping them indoors won't work? I might be able to help
 

FortCluck

Hatch-a-Long Queen
Premium Feather Member
Sep 9, 2019
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Domestic rabbits and wild rabbits are very different. Wild rabbits will have a much much easier time living outside, whereas domestic rabbits won't. It's like the difference between dogs and wolves.
Lennon the Bunny has some great videos explaining why better than I can.
May I ask why keeping them indoors won't work? I might be able to help
I have to say that YouTube channel isn’t the greatest if you want your bunny outside. The person always bashes people who do that... I find it quite irritating. I get what they’re saying, but bunnies would rather be outside. Mine hated it inside and love it outside. That YouTube is so wrong!
 

EverythingDucks

Crowing
May 7, 2020
1,588
6,169
263
Clearwater, Florida
I wish it were only the timothy hay, but all the people in my family are allergic to fur and feathers. Non hypo-allergenic dogs, cats, yes, even chickens..
Oof, I can relate. Allergies suck. I had to take something called SLIT for a few years to even be able to have hypoallergenic dogs. It's basically like a allergy shot but it's just something you spray under your tongue. Thankfully it worked for me but it doesn't work for everyone.
Are they groomed often? Regular grooming helps keep dead hair that can cause allergies off the rabbit.
Some people with rabbit allergies have a room where they let their rabbit free roam and they just clean it with a mask and change their clothes after.
 

EverythingDucks

Crowing
May 7, 2020
1,588
6,169
263
Clearwater, Florida
I have to say that YouTube channel isn’t the greatest if you want your bunny outside. The person always bashes people who do that... I find it quite irritating. I get what they’re saying, but bunnies would rather be outside. Mine hated it inside and love it outside. That YouTube is so wrong!
I think that people should do what works best for them and their rabbits, but if free roaming inside is a possibility it often works well. I understand not everyone can do this though.
I just like to tell people about it because most don't know about it, and she does have some good videos on diet, grooming, and potty training which come in use for all rabbit owners.
 

ChocolateMouse

Free Ranging
7 Years
Jul 29, 2013
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Cleveland OH
:oops: I mean, IMO as long as they're cared for and not in a tiny cage, they're in a good home. I have seen PLENTY of house rabbits go into cages indoors, or get shut in rooms, and never really cared for... And lots of outdoor farm bunnies get spoiled and loved on every day. Lots of farm dogs live outdoors too... Indoors/outdoors isn't exactly an indication of care quality.

People who don't put their rabbits indoors are fine. Just different strokes for different folks. As long as they have space, basic needs, and enrichment, I say they're doing well. I think training, time spent interacting with, accommodation of needs, medical care, etc. are the better indicators of quality of life.
 

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