The Bunny Chat Thread - For Bunny Owners

ChocolateMouse

Free Ranging
7 Years
Jul 29, 2013
3,952
11,066
517
Cleveland OH
No roses or marigold here, but we do have a quince shrub we feed out to the rabbits. They love it. :) It's honestly kind of hard to keep the quince under control so to's great to have some bunnies so excited to help with the task. XD I just go out with a pair of nippers, cut several branches and suckers, then put them hanging from the tops of the cages like you can see in the one picture with the black bunny. They eat the leaves off the bottom of the branches and then either stand up to eat them or they pull the whole stick in. It's really good enrichment. Keeps their teeth in check too.
 

Compost King

Free Ranging
Apr 19, 2018
3,110
10,536
667
Salisbury, North Carolina
IMG_5767.JPG

Hay Rack... still not sure if if rain water runs down the side of the wall when it rains and if it does I have to make adjustments.

I discovered that the Female Rabbit has designated her own personal pooping area and she picked the easiest spot for me to deal with. She is the opposite of my cat in that regards who goes out of her way to be a pain in my butt. I love cats so I put up with her.

To make the hay rack I used part of an old 5 hole rabbit cage that got crushed in an incident and it was too much work to fix it so I used it as a spare parts cage material that I used to patch holes in coops or making vents.
 

igorsMistress

Crossing the road barefoot.
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Apr 9, 2013
19,055
95,323
1,502
My Coop
View attachment 2273998
Hay Rack... still not sure if if rain water runs down the side of the wall when it rains and if it does I have to make adjustments.

I discovered that the Female Rabbit has designated her own personal pooping area and she picked the easiest spot for me to deal with. She is the opposite of my cat in that regards who goes out of her way to be a pain in my butt. I love cats so I put up with her.

To make the hay rack I used part of an old 5 hole rabbit cage that got crushed in an incident and it was too much work to fix it so I used it as a spare parts cage material that I used to patch holes in coops or making vents.
I really dig your reuse/recycle attitude :highfive:
BTW the remaining Dorking mix hen I have has become the roosters favorite girl. I've named her Cuckoo because she's batsh!+ crazy but he adores her.
 

ChocolateMouse

Free Ranging
7 Years
Jul 29, 2013
3,952
11,066
517
Cleveland OH
I'm happy to find this thread as we're planning on getting 2 bunnies as pets and I have a question. Should we get 2 females or a male and a female? We would get them neutered/spayed. We're leaning towards getting Mini Lops if we can find some. My husband will build an outdoor hutch and they'll live together out there. Thanks!
If you get them fixed quite young and keep them together from a young age it doesn't matter very much in my experience. Young rabbits are happy to bond with one another and integrate.

Here's a picture of three litters about a month apart total in age I stuck together into one cage to make some extra room. It took about 2 days before everyone was getting along this well. The whites I think were about 14 weeks, the brokens 12 the blacks 10. This was a temporary situation - lasted about a month.
Threelitters.png


If they're older (say, over 20 weeks) and not raised together my experience says a male/female pair will cohabitatate more peacefully and are more likely to bond, though I've certainly had brothers live with their brothers (and same with sisters) for longer term than that without problems. But that's because they were raised together and bonded quite young.

Once bunnies are bonded together (behaving peacefully like littermates), as long as they're fixed before they hit puberty there tends to be no issues.

After puberty, it just gets harder and a boy and girl are more likely to get along.
 

locoyosh

Songster
6 Years
Mar 6, 2014
51
114
124
Lehigh Valley, PA
If you get them fixed quite young and keep them together from a young age it doesn't matter very much in my experience. Young rabbits are happy to bond with one another and integrate.

Here's a picture of three litters about a month apart total in age I stuck together into one cage to make some extra room. It took about 2 days before everyone was getting along this well. The whites I think were about 14 weeks, the brokens 12 the blacks 10. This was a temporary situation - lasted about a month.
View attachment 2274209

If they're older (say, over 20 weeks) and not raised together my experience says a male/female pair will cohabitatate more peacefully and are more likely to bond, though I've certainly had brothers live with their brothers (and same with sisters) for longer term than that without problems. But that's because they were raised together and bonded quite young.

Once bunnies are bonded together (behaving peacefully like littermates), as long as they're fixed before they hit puberty there tends to be no issues.

After puberty, it just gets harder and a boy and girl are more likely to get along.
This was very helpful. Thank you for your reply!
 

FortCluck

Hatch-a-Long Queen
Premium Feather Member
Sep 9, 2019
20,874
90,569
1,237
Central Virginia
No roses or marigold here, but we do have a quince shrub we feed out to the rabbits. They love it. :) It's honestly kind of hard to keep the quince under control so to's great to have some bunnies so excited to help with the task. XD I just go out with a pair of nippers, cut several branches and suckers, then put them hanging from the tops of the cages like you can see in the one picture with the black bunny. They eat the leaves off the bottom of the branches and then either stand up to eat them or they pull the whole stick in. It's really good enrichment. Keeps their teeth in check too.
Mine love fresh herbs too. They go crazy over them. I’m mowing the grass today and I’ll rake some fresh grass for them.
 

FortCluck

Hatch-a-Long Queen
Premium Feather Member
Sep 9, 2019
20,874
90,569
1,237
Central Virginia
If you get them fixed quite young and keep them together from a young age it doesn't matter very much in my experience. Young rabbits are happy to bond with one another and integrate.

Here's a picture of three litters about a month apart total in age I stuck together into one cage to make some extra room. It took about 2 days before everyone was getting along this well. The whites I think were about 14 weeks, the brokens 12 the blacks 10. This was a temporary situation - lasted about a month.
View attachment 2274209

If they're older (say, over 20 weeks) and not raised together my experience says a male/female pair will cohabitatate more peacefully and are more likely to bond, though I've certainly had brothers live with their brothers (and same with sisters) for longer term than that without problems. But that's because they were raised together and bonded quite young.

Once bunnies are bonded together (behaving peacefully like littermates), as long as they're fixed before they hit puberty there tends to be no issues.

After puberty, it just gets harder and a boy and girl are more likely to get along.
I have two females that I haven’t fixed yet, but I want to. They’re so cute. They’re siblings and I haven’t had issues yet. They absolutely love each other.
 

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