The Old Folks Home

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Wisher1000, Jul 28, 2012.

  1. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    St. Louis, MO
    Energy source hot wire and neutral (L1 and L2) have to go directly to the fan, not fed from the thermostat. If it were DC, wiring backwards would make the fan run backwards. AC doesn't matter.

    I've been using carabiners and leash latches on all the hasps too but I can't afford to lose another bird so thought I'd go with padlocks on the most vulnerable doors and nests. Some doors have locking handles. I have 32 hasps. Mostly one per door but 6 doors are long so I have one on each end. I currently have 8 padlocks all keyed the same.

    Had 3 traps set last night and caught nothing. I'm making 4 more traps today. One box trap with a #1.5 jaw trap and a live rat for bait in a cage. 3 PVC pipe traps baited with mice. I'm just hoping the # 1.5 aren't too strong for a 4 ounce blood sucker to trip. The bait was taken from the trap in front of a burrow without tripping it.
    Cabelas didn't have any size # 0 and the # 1s were more expensive. I may go online and get a couple # 0s. I'll probably set them from time to time even after this passes.

    This is the description of the largest of the 3 weasel species native to Missouri from the MDC website.
    Size: Males: total length: 13½–17½ inches; tail length: 4½–6¼ inches; weight: 6–9½ ounces. Females: total length: 11½–15½ inches; tail length: 3–5 inches; weight: 2½–4½ ounces.
    Habitat and conservation:
    Weasels live in a variety of habitats but prefer woodlands, brushy fencerows and thickets along watercourses. Their home is a shallow burrow that was usually the former abode of a mole, ground squirrel or mouse. They also live in rock piles, under tree roots and in dense brushy vegetation. While not abundant in our state, weasels should be encouraged and appreciated. Regulation of harvest is essential, as this species is state-ranked as Vulnerable and is a Species of Conservation Concern.
    Foods:
    Long-tailed weasels eat animal food entirely, preferring their prey alive and quivering. The only carrion consumed consists of victims they have stored in their burrows. As long as rodents are available, they are eaten almost exclusively. Major food items are mice, rats, squirrels, chipmunks, shrews, moles and rabbits, and occasionally small birds, bird eggs, reptiles amphibians, earthworms and some insects. Despite their size, weasels are voracious predators.
    Distribution in Missouri:
    Statewide. Most common in the south-central and southwestern portions.
    More interesting info:
    Fur was harvested in the past, but weasels no longer may be trapped in Missouri. Many weasels are destroyed by farmers who report them killing poultry. Certain individuals sometimes kill poultry, but the species as a whole causes little economic loss. Weasels eat large numbers of mice and rats.
    Ecosystem connections:
    Weasels are aggressive and ferocious predators that eat mice, rats, shrews and even cottontail rabbits. They are also fed upon by other predators such as great horned owls, hawks, foxes and bobcats.

    I had to contact the conservation agent on duty yesterday to report my planned trapping methods and my address. I also have to tell them how many I catch. Legal trapping season for furbearers in MO is from November 15-January 31. But weasels and spotted skunks may not be taken.

    On another positive note. I didn't lose any last night and I caught my rooster on the lam at 5 this morning. I've tried each of the last 4 nights and mornings but couldn't find out where he was roosting. There are 2 groves of trees where he was hanging out during the day so I searched them at dusk and couldn't find him. One was fairly open and all pines with some honeysuckle. The other was a virtually impenetrable mix of hardwoods, honeysuckle and bramble. I was hoping he wasn't in that one. I stood between the two at first light waiting for his first crow. He was in neither. He had put himself to bed on a big rock at the back of a dead end corridor between 2 outbuildings. It was still dark enough that I could temporarily distract him with a flashlight and get close enough to put a net on him.
    So now I officially have 2 breeding age males. The one I caught this morning was my oldest rooster. He couldn't save his flock from the midnight blood suckers but he saved himself. He was in the building that had the wall pried off the first night.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2014
  2. chickadoodles

    chickadoodles Chicken Obsessed

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    South West Alabama
    CC how wonderful that you got your rooster back! Things are looking up.
     
  3. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    St. Louis, MO
    I'm sure the 3 neighbors whose houses surround the outbuildings he was crowing in will be glad he's gone too. Crowing in that corridor, the sound was coming out like a megaphone at a house about 40 ft. away.
     
  4. chickadoodles

    chickadoodles Chicken Obsessed

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    South West Alabama
    [​IMG]

    I think it will be sounding like that at my house soon as I have over 30 cockerels in my rooster run that I am growing out.
    We only have a few mobile homes back behind us, but I am sure they are not looking forward to them all crowing every day! [​IMG]
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    I had 12 crowing at once. It is peaceful here now. I was looking forward to getting down to 5 roosters but with the remainders in the freezer rather than this method.
     
  6. chickadoodles

    chickadoodles Chicken Obsessed

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    South West Alabama
    I am sorry CC. We will sale ours when they are 6 months old.
     
  7. JW12

    JW12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Greenback, TN

    I'm not sure where you are but I will see your ocean and raise you a sunrise at the beach lol
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Cynthia12

    Cynthia12 Always Grateful Premium Member

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    Utah
    X's 3..or 4..I lose count. Yumm!
     
  9. Peep_Show

    Peep_Show Overrun With Chickens

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    Corrales, NM
    All the baked goods..... YUMMM!!!! [​IMG]


    Last summer when renovating the yard I almost took out this little weedy shrub under an apple tree. Then I spied a singular green orb dangling like Charlie Brown's tree's lone ornament and realized I needed to take better care of this bush. This year after blooming I put some bird netting over it. Today was a harvest of GOOSEBERRIES! (Or, as my British friend says, "Goozbreez.")

    [​IMG]

    It's quite exciting because we never had these growing up nor are they found in our groceries. We threw a few in our cereal this morning and they were yummy jammy orbs. I'm thinking maybe making jam or pie. Anyone got a recipe? I went online, but all the recipes I found were from the UK and in grams and metrics.....
     
  10. ronott1

    ronott1 Daily Digest Guru Premium Member Project Manager

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    Woodland, California
    My Coop
    You are so lucky!

    I found a very simple way to make the jam. Goose Berries do not need pectin, so you pretty much just need to figure out the sugar:

    Quote: Follow the instructions for making any jam:

    fill warm jars with the fruit prepared as above up to 1\4 of an inch from the rim. Put clean, warmed in a sauce pan of hot water lids and then rings. Seal and Put jars into a water bath and boil for 10 minutes. Remove from water bath and let the jars rest upside down on the counter for 10 minutes. Turn right side up and let cool. The jars should be sealed tightly by the next day.

    Of course you could make a small batch and leave it in the fridge too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2014

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