The REAL truth behind crested ducks

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Crestedduckling, Jun 14, 2015.

  1. Crestedduckling

    Crestedduckling New Egg

    7
    0
    7
    Mar 4, 2015
    I have been breeding for about 2 years but where I have learned this information is between 2 things and a girl how has been breeding the actual breed of this **** for 10 years and has most and almost all of her eggs hatch with 1 or 2 of them without a crest and same as me also thanks for sharing about crests can also be on other ducks I thought that was how it is but I never really looked into it
     
  2. Crestedduckling

    Crestedduckling New Egg

    7
    0
    7
    Mar 4, 2015
    my crested ducks do not have any special needs at all and they are normal and everyone is entitled to there own opinion u might think that these aren't facts but they really are the only problem with my ducks is predictors eating them
     
  3. Amykins

    Amykins Overrun With Chickens

    4,771
    439
    276
    May 11, 2013
    You may have gotten extremely lucky with the health of your crested ducks, but that doesn't mean that the breed isn't problematic for having health issues. You're right, everyone is entitled to their own opinion and stating your opinion on something sure don't make it fact, but a good chunk of wisdom is knowing which is which.

    The very least you could do was do a little research and read up on the plethora of genetic problems crested ducks commonly suffer from. The gene that causes the crest is ALWAYS lethal if a baby has two copies of the dominant gene. And you need to understand that if you breed your crests to one another, 1/4 to 1/2 of all your babies will make it all the way to hatch, only to survive a few tortured minutes of life. And this is what they will look like. All because you were too proud and too stubborn to accept a simple truth.


    [​IMG]
     
  4. Crestedduckling

    Crestedduckling New Egg

    7
    0
    7
    Mar 4, 2015
    You may think this is not the truth but it is and I have had success with all of my ducklings for 2 years and so has the other breeder I am sorry if this dissapoints u but it is the truth to me
     
  5. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    43,519
    484
    486
    Dec 22, 2009
    I'm guessing by the title of this post you've already read my other thread. Due to this I'd like to reiterate some things.


    I see this is your first time posting in the duck section. Even when people don't agree with one another it's always nice to see more people who love their ducks. I'm glad you've decided to join us down in the duck section. [​IMG].




    1). The truth can be subjective. For example: The majority of the people on the site find the taste of eggs to be delicious. Even though I keep laying birds around I still don't happen to like the taste of eggs. In this scenario everybody is being truthful even with different opinions.


    2) There is a huge difference between opinions and facts/scientific laws. We can agree to disagree on the appeal of a certain color but something more concrete such as the law of gravity isn't up to such interpretation. Even if someone doesn't choose to believe in gravity there's still going to be gravity. One of my favorite quotes actually pertains to this situation:
    “Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.” - Aldous Huxley


    3) Mutations do not cease to exist just because a breed is standardized. There is no evidence to support the idea that the crest formed on the APA recognized crested duck is any different from the crest on a Pekin or Mallard. These are both caused by the same crested gene that can pop up in any of the mallard derived breeds.


    4). I agree with the above poster about you and your breeder friend both being quite "lucky". Many aspects of genetics aren't a sure fire thing especially when it comes to recessive genes. It can all be a numbers game. That is why most scientific studies that have any validity tend to have very large sample sizes to see the effects of something. Let's say for example you choose to hatch one brood this year. You decide to hatch 10 eggs and 8 end up hatching. That would give you the impression that you had about an 80 percent hatch rate with your birds. Now there's going to be a theoretical brood for the next hatch. Let's say that you set 15 eggs and only 2 end up hatching from this brood. This would have put your hatch rate at 40 percent instead of 80 for the year.While the first hatch seemed all fine a larger sample size can show you the true effects the gene can have on mortality rates.


    5). This last statement seemed to go over a lot of people's head on my original thread: If you want to have crested ducks then have crested ducks. Nobody is trying to make you feel guilty or tell you what to do. It's your money, time, and flock. You should do what you what feels right for you. The only issue I and possibly others have is when information is spread as absolute fact when in reality it's just an opinion on the subject. Especially when there is strong scientific evidence supporting the opposite of what is being said.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. seashoreduck

    seashoreduck Chillin' With My Peeps

    276
    21
    106
    May 6, 2013
    2 years as a backyard farmer is ummm?? good I guess. I would of expected you to say decades. 2 years is nothing, at most you could have 3 or 4 generations if very young. That actually results you're getting really aren't from your raising at all, but as a result of a very careful, good breeder (like Metzer). Remember, genetics exceptionally go bad after generations go by. I expect you may not feel the same way after a few years.
     
  7. Haley Jo

    Haley Jo New Egg

    3
    1
    6
    Jun 2, 2015
    Texas
    I have quite a few crested ducks..... feeling on the head they are normal typical ducks with normal heads. Personally i feel this is not a dying matter for the ducks. I also have multiple crested chickens as well...nothing wrong with them. They live normal happy lives just like the rest. Idk why your syaing this is cruel........... do you believe people who procreate and have 21 chromosome children should stop bc they are having genetically falted children? NO THATS SCREWED UP. I also have alot of frizzled as well. The frizzled gene is a genetic mutation, so should i not breed them either bc they are mutants? UH NO b.s.. they live very normal and healthy lives ,happy as can be. ALSO over time the skull gets hard as the duck or chick grows. The bones get strong and theres usually never a problem with the skull. SOOOO should peopme not have babies because a baby has a squishy skull? Thats potential dangers all over for a few years. Thats mutation at its finest right there. I am 23 and have been born and raised into agricultural development. From goats, horses, pigs, cattle, birds, dogs,cats, you name it i have probably had it.

    Try not to be so narrow minded.
    You want to talk about cruel...this duck issue isnt cruel....prodution layers are cruel. Living inside filth in a box the size of an ipad is CRUEL. Fight a real problem in life.
    Or commercial pigs who literally are stacked in cages to the ceiling pig on top gets food and the rest literally have to eat each others crap. Cage by cage level by level on poops, poop falls below to the next pig. That pig eats the crap and so the cycle begins again so on and so fourth. GET REAL AND TALK ABOUT REAL CRUELTY.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2015
  8. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    43,519
    484
    486
    Dec 22, 2009
    The genetic genes that causes a "crest" in chickens and ducks are in no way related at all. A chicken's crest is formed by the HOXC8 gene. This gene simply causes feathers to be grown on the dorsal skin. (The dorsal skin in this case is on the back of the bird's head.) It does not in any way affect cranial growth in the way that the "crested" gene does in ducks.

    Mutations are not the problem at hand. Mutations are a common thing in genetics and create a wide variety of new genetic possibilities. The issue with the crested gene is that it is a known fatal gene. It is also a gene that statistically affects massive numbers when it comes to breeding with the gene. It's statistically much more common than the 0.14% chance of child being born with down syndrome. Also, the frizzle gene is not necessarily fatal. A frazzle chicken doesn't die necessarily just because it's feathers are different. It tends to perish due to issues that the bird are made more susceptible to due to their feathering. Special care can certainly be made to minimize the associated risks though.


    I would like to clarify that the missing skull part will never actually "harden" per se. There will always be a hole in the area where the crest has formed. The fatty tissue in it's place might harden with age but the cranial area will always be somewhat at risk. Should the fatty tissue growth be too much it could potentially cause pressure on the brain that could affect motor skills or even cause brain hemorrhaging.


    If people want to have a crested duck then that is their prerogative. However, due to the nature of the gene a contention is completely justifiable and somewhat necessary.
    That is the great thing about BYC. We can have completely different views on the subject but at the end of the day we're both just trying to shed light on a subject that everyone might not be informed or aware of. I hope you'll continue to post in the duck section @Haley Jo
    . It's always great to have someone who's clearly quite passionate about animals around.
     
  9. Cockatrice6420

    Cockatrice6420 Chillin' With My Peeps

    This is the thread on ducks with the most recent activity, HELP please. I'm incredibly worried about one of my ducks. Foaming from white mouth and nostrils, gurgling, blood on straw, lathargic, free range, no poisons, fresh feed and water daily, 5 mo old, only fowl with symptoms, female, cayuga.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    43,519
    484
    486
    Dec 22, 2009
    What kind of feed is she on?

    What are some plants she would have access to?

    Do you have any close neighbors?
     
    1 person likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by