The Redyre FULL Litter

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Redyre Rotties, Dec 20, 2011.

  1. Redyre Rotties

    Redyre Rotties Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 8, 2009
    North Carolina, USA
    Redyre Choice of a Lifetime (BIS BISS CH Carter's Noble Shaka Zulu, top winning Rottweiler of all time X 2XMBBIS RMBBIS UCH 3XHIT UCH Multi BOS CH Eternal Moon Finders Keepers CD RN TT TDI CGC) is in season. The first progesterone test for ovulation timing was yesterday. Results were 0.6, which means she is in the beginning stages of ramping up for ovulation. Ovulation occurs at 5, so she has a ways to go. We visit tomorrow for another test.

    "Iffie" will be visiting BIS BISS GCH Ivoss Rotley Crew V Caloosa Ranch CD ( BISS Select Am CH CrystalÂ’s Topaz v Ponca X Multi-BOSS Amer CH Ivoss Ducks For Diddle) later this week for late February puppies.

    I will update on this thread as we go along, and when the breeding has been accomplished and a whelping date is known.

    Iffie has 1 AKC GCH, 1 AKC CH and 1 UKC CH brothers, with another who needs majors to finish. 5 in her litter are OFA hip, elbow, eye, and heart normal.
     
  2. Rusty Hills Farm

    Rusty Hills Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 3, 2008
    Up at the barn
    Lordy but Redyre is BUSY! Good luck on another healthy litter.

    [​IMG]

    Rusty
     
  3. solanaskyes

    solanaskyes Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:Just out of curiosity, why did you choose to breed to Shaka Zulu knowing he had DJD in his elbows and did not pass OFA on it? Elbow issues are notorious in my breed, so I'm honestly curious about the reasoning...
     
  4. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Central Ohio
    Solanaskyes - which breed are you referring to?
     
  5. Rusty Hills Farm

    Rusty Hills Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 3, 2008
    Up at the barn
    RO-EL7471F29-VPI ELBOW Jan 19 2010 Feb 4 2010 29 NORMAL

    Direct quote from OFA's site re Choice of a Lifetime. While I don't breed dogs, I DO breed horses and the object is to work to improve your animals. We breed the best we've got to the best we can find and hope for even better to be the result. Obviously that is what happened here. We've improved our own line in tiny increments over the years. It's taken a long time but we've got better than what we started with. And after this last weekend, I'd have to say Redyre has done the same.

    Fantastic win, btw. Have you touched ground yet, Redyre?

    [​IMG]


    Rusty​
     
  6. Rusty Hills Farm

    Rusty Hills Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 3, 2008
    Up at the barn
    And as the late Bobby Roos (Wickmere Collies) once told me about collie eyes: "You cannot take an eye check into the ring with you." They are more than eyes, elbows, and hips. You breed the all-over best you have to the all-over best you can find. You've got to look at the WHOLE animal and base your decisions on that. Obviously that is what Redyre is doing or she would not be getting the good OFA checks that she gets and STILL have such major successes in the ring. Breeding successfully to improve your stock is a VERY tricky dance and takes a lot of study, experience, and more than a little heartbreak to pull off. My hat goes off to you, Redyre, for such successful executions of that tricky dance. You've done it repeatedly now and I think a little respect for your knowledge and ability is in order here. I, for one, have admired your dogs tremendously since I first saw Milton, then Gracie, and now on up through your success with Katie.


    All best wishes,


    Rusty
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2011
  7. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    Land of Lincoln
    Quote:I do remember Mr Roos and Whickmere Collies back in the heydays and it is true to this day that you can not take an eye check into the ring with you. That is the very reason why we all OFA our collies at U of I and every litter we had came back normal. When my mother first had collies from farmers, it was awful and so much heartache, she pulled by the bootstraps and dig harder in her pocketbooks for BETTER collies. Now she had been succesfully raised and now retired from raising show collies.

    Every breeder assume the risk and KNOW the risk of inherited genetics and most of the time, with diligent care and experience, you CAN succeed and hope for the best in future generations you can weed it out. We are responsible for weeding out the bad, weigh the odds against your goals and expectations of your litters if a parent has every acceptable quality. If we had known it is very bad and it does pass down, we would not go that route, endangering the breed to collapse with so many inferior qualities.

    Sure I can go on and list the famous collies in history that has been KNOWN to pass down the genetic faults that plague in the 70-80's but now the lines have contunied and no more problems arised from that line or lines. Its the dedications of its breeders who REALLY want to work with that line and was able to successfully bred out the lines.

    I am guessing you could do that with the Impressive muscle disease in QHs too. If that horse is soooooo good, that breeder would have a closed stock until he is HYTPP negative. Impossible? Nearly so.
     
  8. babyblue2

    babyblue2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 14, 2011
    Quote:Hypp could be bred out in a single generation if all who were +/+ or +/- would be allowed to be registered on the requirement of being gelded or in mares case spayed. There are still enough horses (aqha), even in the impressive line to remove it from the gene pool and keep the line alive.

    As far as Redyre Rotties dogs go, You breed to the best you can find and afford. It the whole of the animal just not one small part.
     
  9. Rusty Hills Farm

    Rusty Hills Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 3, 2008
    Up at the barn
    Every breeder assume the risk and KNOW the risk of inherited genetics and most of the time, with diligent care and experience, you CAN succeed and hope for the best in future generations you can weed it out. We are responsible for weeding out the bad, weigh the odds against your goals and expectations of your litters if a parent has every acceptable quality. If we had known it is very bad and it does pass down, we would not go that route, endangering the breed to collapse with so many inferior qualities.

    Sure I can go on and list the famous collies in history that has been KNOWN to pass down the genetic faults that plague in the 70-80's but now the lines have contunied and no more problems arised from that line or lines. Its the dedications of its breeders who REALLY want to work with that line and was able to successfully bred out the lines.

    What we have to remember is that those breeders back in the 70s and 80s did not know nearly what we now know about genetics. They did not have the testing we have now. Now we have the tools to know what we've got genetic-wise without test breeding the way they had to do in order to know what they had or didn't have. This is why I cannot understand the puppy buyers who cannot be bothered to do the testing. Why can they not see how they are harming ALL the puppies in their chosen breed by denying breeders every scrap of information that will help them make informed decisions that ultimately affect the entire breed?!?

    Hypp could be bred out in a single generation if all who were +/+ or +/- would be allowed to be registered on the requirement of being gelded or in mares case spayed. There are still enough horses (aqha), even in the impressive line to remove it from the gene pool and keep the line alive.

    What drives me insane are the so-called "experts" who claim the HYPP testing program is a failure because fewer and fewer animals are being tested each year. The IDIOTS cannot seem to grasp the simple reality that when you breed 2 horses who have already tested N/N, the offspring are N/N and therefore do not need testing. The more such breeding that occurs, the fewer tests need to be done, and eventually we won't need to test anybody at all. So what they see as a failure is actually proof positive that the program is WORKING!!!

    As painful as it is, I wholeheartedly support a requirement that only N/N be used for breeding.


    JMO, as always.


    Rusty​
     
  10. Jamie_Dog_Trainer

    Jamie_Dog_Trainer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 8, 2008
    Washington State
    Yikes, that does seem to be a lot of concentrated joint issue going into a litter. I also know that a lot of GSD breeders will breed with the same thoughts as Rebekah does. I wonder when does idealism vs reality really show in a breed, and I am not talking just about Rotties or GSD's either.
     

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