The Truth about Medicated Feed and Waterfowl

NCBantam22

Chirping
6 Years
Mar 14, 2013
137
9
83
Most people think ducklings and goslings have to be fed non-medicated which is not true, older medicated feeds were to be harmful to waterfowl because they had different medications.
Modern starter-grower feeds are medicated with amprolium which is NOT harmful to goslings and ducklings, check the ingredients to be 100% sure the feed is medicated with amprolium. Waterfowl babies need to be protected from the same diseases as other poultry do. If the feed is amprolium medicated it is SAFE for waterfowl babies. I'm posting this because I see many people telling new duck owners to avoid all medicated feed and it is untrue. Feed amprolium-medicated feed because it will help prevent nasty diseases and prevent a high vet bill.
 

anniele27

Chirping
5 Years
Apr 10, 2014
175
7
73
Illinois
I agree completely After doing lots and lots of research I have found that medicated feed is perfectly fine! It's a shame that others are getting bad advice because of a decade old myth.
 

Funniducki1

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jan 16, 2011
44
0
22
This is an interesting topic. Thank you for all your research, it is good to know that the antibiotic you mentioned is safe for waterfowl.

It seems to me that if you start with healthy babies from healthy flocks, keep the food fresh and water clean, and keep the baby waterfowl in a dry clean and warm brooder, there is absolutely no need to give them medicated feed. Giving an animal a medicine just because it may help prevent something is that really isn't a problem in properly cared for waterfowl seems wasteful and I wonder if would cause long term harm (or future antibiotic resistance). Don't get me wrong, I am all about prevention, but in my experience there is nothing to prevent if they are cared for properly.

I have personally raised ducks for 13 years, and I don't call myself an expert, but I have never had one die of a disease yet, adults or ducklings, and have fed various brands of non-medicated chick starter/grower with minimal supplements other than fresh forage. Waterfowl just don't get sick like chickens and turkeys do, they just don't get the same diseases or disease period if they are not crammed together like in a factory farm setup and are kept in a relatively clean pen.

But, I also understand everyone has their own preference and experiences which readily tie into their flock management.
 
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Speceider

Songster
8 Years
Apr 4, 2011
1,169
108
161
This is an interesting topic. Thank you for all your research, it is good to know that the antibiotic you mentioned is safe for waterfowl.

It seems to me that if you start with healthy babies from healthy flocks, keep the food fresh and water clean, and keep the baby waterfowl in a dry clean and warm brooder, there is absolutely no need to give them medicated feed. Giving an animal a medicine just because it may help prevent something is that really isn't a problem in properly cared for waterfowl seems wasteful and I wonder if would cause long term harm (or future antibiotic resistance). Don't get me wrong, I am all about prevention, but in my experience there is nothing to prevent if they are cared for properly.

I have personally raised ducks for 13 years, and I don't call myself an expert, but I have never had one die of a disease yet, adults or ducklings, and have fed various brands of non-medicated chick starter/grower with minimal supplements other than fresh forage. Waterfowl just don't get sick like chickens and turkeys do, they just don't get the same diseases or disease period if they are not crammed together like in a factory farm setup and are kept in a relatively clean pen.

But, I also understand everyone has their own preference and experiences which readily tie into their flock management.

I would point out that amprolium is not an antibiotic, but rather a thiamine blocker that functions as a cocciostat. Certainly will not increase antibiotic resistance.

Clint
 

Funniducki1

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jan 16, 2011
44
0
22
I would point out that amprolium is not an antibiotic, but rather a thiamine blocker that functions as a cocciostat. Certainly will not increase antibiotic resistance.

Clint
Good to know, thanks.

Have you all had problems with coccidiosis with ducklings?

I once had it in a goat, it was awful, but never in my chickens or ducks.
 
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NCBantam22

Chirping
6 Years
Mar 14, 2013
137
9
83
Good to know, thanks.

Have you all had problems with coccidiosis with ducklings?

I once had it in a goat, it was awful, but never in my chickens or ducks.
I haven't had ducks get it bit I've had chickens get it before.
 
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