There's no place like home.

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Azureduckchick

Songster
Jul 23, 2020
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I have to agree as well. Even if they're somehow able to survive on their own, you bought/adopted them so decided to become responsible for them. It would then be also your responsibility to find a home (where they continue to get a level of care comperable to what they've had their entire lives), not drop them off near some water and drive off. Sounds like the definition of dumping to me. It saddens me how quick some people are to toss away living creatures the moment they get a bit nippy or don't behave perfectly. :(
Yes I agree.
 

Azureduckchick

Songster
Jul 23, 2020
464
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Western Massachusetts
On the subject of "can the ducks fly?" I've never found a mallard, wild or tame, that couldn't fly, unless someone clipped its wings. My parents bought some from TSC years ago. Those ducks, and their descendants, migrate every winter and come back every summer. At one point, the flock was up to nearly forty ducks. Now it's composed of about thirteen, mostly male. I'm pretty sure that wild mallards are genetically the same as tame, and have the same instincts.

That said, these ones will have a tougher time surviving in the wild because they haven't been raised there, and haven't been taught safe behaviours by a parent duck. I suspect about half of these ones will be eaten by something.
Yes and OP should have known this.
 

kaumlauf

Songster
Nov 2, 2010
176
36
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Cambridge Springs, PA
@Duck mommy 2019, Read, and please educate yourself about the reality. Read all the first hand accounts of people who have purchased Mallards (it is the same species whether purchased or found in the wild) and raised them, and have seen them successfully migrate , year after year, to the same, home location before you start making statements that have no basis in fact.
 

kaumlauf

Songster
Nov 2, 2010
176
36
166
Cambridge Springs, PA
Yes and OP should have known this.
@kaumlauf you dumped your Mallards and I would like to know how you became in possession of them. Did you get them at tractor supply, hatchery? Why did you get them if you could not keep them?
@Azureduckchick, before you respond again in ignorance, please do some research, say more than 20 minutes worth. . If you can't respond intelligently to a situation, I suggest you keep your comments to yourself. This forum is for the betterment of all, not for the spread of misinformation and personal prejudice.
 

Azureduckchick

Songster
Jul 23, 2020
464
1,194
186
Western Massachusetts
@Azureduckchick, before you respond again in ignorance, please do some research, say more than 20 minutes worth. . If you can't respond intelligently to a situation, I suggest you keep your comments to yourself. This forum is for the betterment of all, not for the spread of misinformation and personal prejudice.
Even if CAPTIVE Mallards have traveled from there home to warmer conditions they still have a home to come back too. You dumped your Mallards that you took responsibility of
 

TomCahalan

Chirping
Feb 13, 2020
308
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Ohio
Unlike many other birds, ducks are precocious. Wild ducklings provide all of their own food. Yes, they follow their mother in a cute line, but she is foraging for herself, not her ducklings. The ducklings fend for themselves. The mother provides them with preen oil and a warm place to snuggle at night. She does not teach them anything. This is why the life expectancy of ducks is so low.

The life expectancy of a wild duck is just under six days. Six days. Meaning that more than half of the ducks that hatch into this world will leave it before they are a week old. Some survive, some die.

https://www.ducks.org/media/Conservation/GLARO/_documents/_library/_research/Duckling_Survival.pdf

Some animals, when raised in captivity, do not have the skills to survive in the wild.

Wild mallards do not learn much from their mother, and therefore are not lacking in the skills that they need to survive in the wild.
 

Duck mommy 2019

Crowing
Apr 1, 2019
2,199
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@Duck mommy 2019, Read, and please educate yourself about the reality. Read all the first hand accounts of people who have purchased Mallards (it is the same species whether purchased or found in the wild) and raised them, and have seen them successfully migrate , year after year, to the same, home location before you start making statements that have no basis in fact.
there is laws protecting them from that, and it’s cruel to leave them. please do research and be prepared for 15+ years before you decide to get ducks. they are a lot of work but can be just as loving and intelligent as dogs if given the chance.
 

Duck mommy 2019

Crowing
Apr 1, 2019
2,199
2,435
261
Unlike many other birds, ducks are precocious. Wild ducklings provide all of their own food. Yes, they follow their mother in a cute line, but she is foraging for herself, not her ducklings. The ducklings fend for themselves. The mother provides them with preen oil and a warm place to snuggle at night. She does not teach them anything. This is why the life expectancy of ducks is so low.

The life expectancy of a wild duck is just under six days. Six days. Meaning that more than half of the ducks that hatch into this world will leave it before they are a week old. Some survive, some die.

https://www.ducks.org/media/Conservation/GLARO/_documents/_library/_research/Duckling_Survival.pdf

Some animals, when raised in captivity, do not have the skills to survive in the wild.

Wild mallards do not learn much from their mother, and therefore are not lacking in the skills that they need to survive in the wild.
they do learn from their mother. watching her forage, where she goes, and everything she does is what they will learn. which is why they stay with her even after they get big enough to not lay under her for heat.
 

416bigbore

Chick-O-Treat !
Premium Feather Member
Jun 11, 2020
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NC
there is laws protecting them from that, and it’s cruel to leave them. please do research and be prepared for 15+ years before you decide to get ducks. they are a lot of work but can be just as loving and intelligent as dogs if given the chance.
Do you have the link to the specific statute Law you are referencing? Did you do your research first before posting that? :confused:
 
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