Three week old chicks pecking, making each other bleed, HELP

VickoRano

In the Brooder
6 Years
Feb 23, 2013
22
0
22
We decided to buy some chicks that were all about the same age, three weeks old. We got five: a brauma, delaware, blue, and two buff orpingtons. They are all pecking each other and one of the buffs is bleeding-- I can't pluck the feathers, I've been "plugging" the pin feathers with starch.

We now have the bleeding one in its own covered box, and the other four separated into their own two boxes. We need advice.

We know they all need to heal before they can interact in the same space, again, because chicks will peck at anything unusual on the other birds... and we don't want them to all be eating blood like they have been. It's incredibly frustrating.

We also have two newborns isolated from the other five, and they're (obviously) doing great. One americauna and one black sex link. They are still pingpong balls and healthy and happy.

But what do we do about the three-week olds?
 

Kernel Cluck

Songster
7 Years
Feb 1, 2012
494
35
141
In front of wood stove keeping warm.
I know this sounds sarcastic... but its not meant to be. Have you given them something to do? I have read that bored chicks are pecking chicks. I gave my a "chick stick" Its made of fat and ground up protein and grain. Hung it from the top of brooder box and they pecked at it all day. The other thing I did was added a bird mirror. Its safe to put in box and they love to peck at the bird looking back at themselves instead of their box mates.





I know this is a bad picture but you can see the chick stick in the foreground and half gone after just a few days.
 

VickoRano

In the Brooder
6 Years
Feb 23, 2013
22
0
22
We are new to this kind of behavior...our last four chickens made it to adulthood without this kind of thing. We let them out to play and let them dust bathe, and play games with them...we even socialize them while we watch tv. But I didnt know about the treat. Id also like to know how to make them.
 

Kernel Cluck

Songster
7 Years
Feb 1, 2012
494
35
141
In front of wood stove keeping warm.
I wish I could tell you that I made it. I actually found them at my local Farm and Fleet in their farm animal section. When I first thought of getting chickens, the guy who help me get my first supplies said he used them for his chicks. They love them and keeps them busy. In their 8 weeks in the brooder box, I bet they went through 4 of them.
 

VickoRano

In the Brooder
6 Years
Feb 23, 2013
22
0
22
Well I'll try them out... and the mirror, too. We need to make a brooder box. A proper one, anyway. Is there anything else you can tell me? Thanks so much, btw!
 

Kernel Cluck

Songster
7 Years
Feb 1, 2012
494
35
141
In front of wood stove keeping warm.
Once they are healed, you could try reintroducing them by seperating the brooder with some wire so they can see but not peck. This is a technique others use to introduce full grown hens. The other thing is you may try spraying the wounds with a product that is something like Blue coat or a name like that. It is an antiseptic and it colors the wounds blue, which I guess chickens don't care to peck at. I do not know if it is safe to use is chicks but it is used commonly in hens.
 

VickoRano

In the Brooder
6 Years
Feb 23, 2013
22
0
22
I will look for bluecoat, thanks! So, if you have a trouble-hen, a brooder box is the best place to put them? I guess I should look for instructions...
 

Kernel Cluck

Songster
7 Years
Feb 1, 2012
494
35
141
In front of wood stove keeping warm.
No tha'ts not what I mean. What I have read is that when you have a hen you want to introduce to a flock, I have heard of people dividing their coop with wire so the hens can coexist and see each other but not get at each other. Sorry, I should have more clear. The idea is keeping the chicks in sight of one another but not able to get at each other until they are used to each smells and looks.
 

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