To Wazine or Not to Wazine before Safeguard?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by accidentalchick, Sep 19, 2013.

  1. accidentalchick

    accidentalchick Out Of The Brooder

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    May 18, 2013
    In early May, I wormed my whole flock with Ivomec pour-on. I've been suspecting worms again lately, but I hadn't rewormed yet. Tonight my husband watched one hen shed two roundworms right in front of him, so we're planning to worm the flock this weekend for sure, as early as tomorrow night. I have free (no cost) and immediate access to Safeguard, which I intend to do orally. Am I running a huge risk to my flock if I don't do Wazine first? I don't have any and would have to wait until later this weekend to get some.
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Proof that ivermectin has lost its effectiveness as a wormer in chickens. Forget the wazine. Go ahead and use the safeguard, then redose again in 10 days.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2013
  3. accidentalchick

    accidentalchick Out Of The Brooder

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    May 18, 2013
    Thank you, dawg! That's what I was hoping to hear. [​IMG] I'm still fairly new to raising chickens (not quite a year in), and to be honest, until May I had no idea that you even needed to worm chickens. I had a sick hen and in researching what to do for her found threads about worming, and so I had no plan either. At the time, Ivomec seemed to be a good option, but as I've gone further into the subject, I regret buying that bottle (smallest one they had but still a lot in there). I'm thankful I have access to the Safeguard though...wish that had been an option in May.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    As you know, chickens are constantly pecking the ground and eating bugs. They pick up infective worm eggs from the soil as well as infected bugs and eat them...this is how chickens get worms, more so than dogs or cats. Keep in mind that not all bugs are infected with worm eggs. Since we dont know if the bugs are infected, it's best to consider a regular worming schedule depending on your soil conditions. Wet warm/ moist soil may require frequent wormings. Cool, mountainous soil or hot desertlike soil may require worming only once a year. The bottom line is that if their feet touch the ground, they'll get worms. Worms can weaken a chickens immune system opening the door for all kinds of diseases to invade their system creating multiple problems. Safeguard is a good wormer. It kills all worms that chickens can get except tapeworms. I've used safeguard often as well as valbazen quite often.
     
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