True Blue Whiting info please?

Chickenlady802

Chirping
Sep 24, 2017
29
37
59
North Clarendon, VT
were did you get your WTB..? and are they a breed..? or a cross..? can they fly to escape..? :D how many eggs a week..? :thumbsup:highfive: also do you or any one , who knows about the Sapphires..? i believe they are cross of a cream leg bar roo X a white leg horn hen, but thats all i know , just needed egg & temperament info on both the WTB & Sapphires :thumbsup:highfive: THANKS
I got one each of the WTB and WTG from Murray McMurray this past June. I get an egg every day from both birds and the eggs went from being small to being the large size you get in the grocery store. My WTB is friendly & will perch on you but the WTG is timid and will only sit with you on her terms. Both are about 1/2 the size of my Buff Orps of the same age. They are beautiful girls & lay beautiful eggs.

Picture 1 is Jessie the WTG
20171201_085212.jpg
Picture 2 is Jordan the WTB
20180103_081550.jpg
 

Diannastarr

Crowing
5 Years
Jun 3, 2014
1,337
1,158
342
Bisbee AZ 85603
I got one each of the WTB and WTG from Murray McMurray this past June. I get an egg every day from both birds and the eggs went from being small to being the large size you get in the grocery store. My WTB is friendly & will perch on you but the WTG is timid and will only sit with you on her terms. Both are about 1/2 the size of my Buff Orps of the same age. They are beautiful girls & lay beautiful eggs.

Picture 1 is Jessie the WTG
View attachment 1236635
Picture 2 is Jordan the WTB
View attachment 1236637
:goodpost:THANKS...!!!!!!! :thumbsup:jumpy:highfive::yesss:

so the white spotted one is the WTB ...???does the WTB fly ..? and dont they lay blue eggs...? very pretty girls..!!!! :highfive::yesss::clap VERY kool indeed...!!!...!!!:woot:yesss::thumbsup:woot
 

Chickenlady802

Chirping
Sep 24, 2017
29
37
59
North Clarendon, VT
Yes, the white one is the WTB and she lays blue eggs. They fly, not far but high. Her favorite perch is the peak of the shed we converted to the coop, especially when it is covered in snow in the dark so she blends in and you can't find her for hours, lol.
 

Justonemorechicken

In the Brooder
Sep 28, 2017
9
25
34
http://whitingfarms.com
http://www.5280.com/2017/06/the-feather

Designing, breeding, and ultimately killing animals to use their parts for fashion or crafting or fly-tying isn’t without controversy. In the early 2010s, for example, when long feathers became fashionable as hair accessories, Whiting Farms’ plumes went for as much as $1 apiece. PETA wasn’t amused. The animal rights organization sent a cease-and-desist letter to one of the feather merchants—which sourced from Whiting Farms—for saying its products came from birds that were “treated unethically.” PETA criticized Whiting on its website for confining roosters in “tiny stacked cages inside deafeningly loud barns before they are killed and skinned.”
 

Sunshine Mesa Farm

In the Brooder
Jan 7, 2018
9
29
44
http://whitingfarms.com
http://www.5280.com/2017/06/the-feather

Designing, breeding, and ultimately killing animals to use their parts for fashion or crafting or fly-tying isn’t without controversy. In the early 2010s, for example, when long feathers became fashionable as hair accessories, Whiting Farms’ plumes went for as much as $1 apiece. PETA wasn’t amused. The animal rights organization sent a cease-and-desist letter to one of the feather merchants—which sourced from Whiting Farms—for saying its products came from birds that were “treated unethically.” PETA criticized Whiting on its website for confining roosters in “tiny stacked cages inside deafeningly loud barns before they are killed and skinned.”
The harvesting (killing) of any animal for purposes of sustenance or clothing or fashion is always controversial. And I'm glad people talk about it. I don't personally think there is a difference between killing an animal to eat and killing it to utilize its parts. Many laying hens are killed simply because they are no longer economically paying for themselves. Dead is dead. I will say that having personally visited and toured his facility, Dr. Whiting's birds have a far better life than those in any factory farm circumstances, be it layer or meat birds. They have much larger cages than factory birds (they must to keep feathers in top condition), they get to live to adulthood, they are on reasonable light cycles, the facility has automatic cleaning systems and the cages themselves are extremely sanitary. He uses the only PETA approved method of humane killing to harvest his birds: carefully monitored CO2 chambers where the birds go to sleep. It's not the life I would choose for my birds, but breeding at a large scale is never "pretty" - I know large scale hatcheries aren't rainbows and sunshine either. Dr. Whiting participates in restoring/saving a lot of heritage breeds from extinction - we saw several birds who were the last few of their breed in the whole world, and he's working to restore them to healthy stocks. Dr. Whiting is also a big advocate for breeding meat birds on a larger scale that "have dignity" as he calls it. He hates what big ag calls the Cornish Cross and finds it utterly inhumane that chickens would be bred so large their legs break and they have heart attacks. He actively promotes these breeds to small and mid-scale producers as alternatives to XCross. So, although I wish all chickens could live in outdoor, pastured environments with sunshine and love, I think he's still doing the chicken world some great favors. If it weren't for folks like him, I do believe backyard chicken keeping would not exist in the form it does today.

I say all this because I firmly believe that it's worthy of discussion, but it also shouldn't take away from the true culprits of inhumane treatment, CAFO's/factory farming. I hope PETA continues to focus on those atrocious large scale operations...I know they have done some really wonderful things exposing them and educating the public.
 

Sunshine Mesa Farm

In the Brooder
Jan 7, 2018
9
29
44
These are Americana leghorn cross.
They definitely have genetics from those birds, but they are more than just a simple cross. They may have started as that cross, but have been selectively bred for egg color, production, and vitality. The production and egg quality of my WTB's rivals my traditional production breeds such as ISA and leghorns - I'm seeing them lay 6 eggs a week. They are also a very consistent shade of blue. This is proving crucially important for our egg laying operation. Egg color is what sells our eggs for top dollar, and no way would our business work if I had a flock of birds like my first Easter Eggers. Love those girls but lucky to get 4 eggs a week from them. I continue to be really impressed by these birds as their eggs have gotten to full size.
 
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