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Trying to be patient, but.....

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by duckielub, Aug 31, 2011.

  1. duckielub

    duckielub Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 20, 2011
    Kentwood
    I hope SOMEONE can help me. I have four Khakis about 24 weeks old. One of them started laying a couple of weeks ago. Despite not having an incubator and all the internet advice I read about not being able to hatch without an incubator, I took six of her eggs after a week. She just didn't show any interest, was laying them at random places in the pen, etc. I put them in a styrofoam cooler on top of a toaster grill and put a heating pad on top. I have been turning and spritzing them a few times every day. Four are developing beautifully from what I can tell, lots of veins and good air sacs. I am absolutely in AWE! I had to throw two out this a.m. - nothing but a yolk inside.

    This is my question. She has since started laying her eggs in the nesting box. She has been laying one a day, has six in there now, and every morning when I go check she has covered them up (prolly scared I'm going to take them again - HA!). Should I give her some time to see if she is going to go broody before I take her eggs? How many do Khakis usually lay before they start sitting on their nests? I have read Khakis are not good at this, but I know there is a chance she might and I'd much rather her do it than me.

    It's really hot down here in Louisiana right now. I would hate to think those eggs are going bad in that nesting box in this heat, but I'm just not experienced enough to know one way or the other.

    BTW, she is turning them. I put an "x" one side, and every morning I get up and the "x" is on the opposite side that it was the day before.

    Thanks in advance for any advice!
     
  2. chamoisee

    chamoisee Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 28, 2011
    I know that the books and catalogs say that Khakis don't make good mothers, but I have had them set on eggs and raise broods....regularly. If you aren't going to eat the eggs, I suppose you could give it a try?
     
  3. duckielub

    duckielub Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 20, 2011
    Kentwood
    Thanks for your reply. [​IMG]I just wanted someone who had them to tell me exactly what you did. I know they're all going to be different, but I hate the steal them from her if there's even a remote possibility she'll sit on them. I don't suppose you could tell me how many yours usually lay before they start sitting on them? I've read anywhere from 8-20, but I'd love to know what yours do.
     
  4. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 31, 2009
    Somerville, AL
    They should be fine. My runner was setting in Florida in June so heat is not an issue. They need to be warm.
     
  5. learycow

    learycow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 1, 2011
    Southern Maine
    My khakis, to my surprise, went broody this year!
    I had 2 hens share a nest in the spring. Between the 2 of them, they had 32 eggs. 25 hatched, the rest were duds. They were horrible mothers though. They would kick the ducklings out as they hatched, and would only sit on the eggs. But it at least saved me from having to use the incubator!
    I currently have 1 khaki hen on eggs. She is sitting on 15, they are due to hatch in a few weeks.

    So yes, I don't know who said campbells were not broody ducks, but they were wrong!
     
  6. chamoisee

    chamoisee Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 28, 2011
    I don't remember how many eggs per nest....we had a lot of ducks (Campbells, Rouens, Harlequins, Runners) and the Campbells were the only ones who reliably hatched out eggs and mothered the ducklings. A few of the Runners tried, but I think that perhaps that narrow little body doesn't provide enough warmth. [​IMG] Their eggs never hatched. The Harlequins did it a couple of times, but the Campbells generally had 8-10 live ducklings per hen, per year.
     

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