Turkeys and chickens together...questions

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by happyhens1972, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. happyhens1972

    happyhens1972 Songster

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    Jul 24, 2013
    Worcester, UK
    I have had a look at a number of threads regarding keeping chickens and turkeys together but can't find much info about their nutritional needs/differences. Can chickens and turkeys both be fed the same food? Either both on turkey pellets, or preferably, both on chicken (layers) pellets as this is what is readily available here.

    If the layers pellet is too low in protein, can it just be supplemented for the turkeys and if so, with what?

    I don't have turkeys yet but am researching as much as possible with a view to adding a duo/trio of turkeys to my existing flock of laying hens...as pets only, not for meat.

    Any help/info will be much appreciated as this side of things doesn't seem to be covered much despite lots of cases of the two species co-habiting.
     

  2. Cole D

    Cole D In the Brooder

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    You can keep chickens and turkeys together, However there will always be a chance that the chickens spread diseases to the turkeys. Personally I haven't had any problems with keeping chickens with turkeys. Layer pellets for chickens are fine for turkeys to eat.
     
  3. doop

    doop In the Brooder

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    I have my turkeys with my chickens, and feed them all flock raiser. I also put out calcium carbonate or oyster shell for the layers. I have had no problems with disease, but some do I think it depends what diseases are prevalent in your area. I had a turkey hen adopt 3 baby chicks 13 weeks ago, and now she's setting on eggs again, but still let's them in her nest box in fact they roost on her back at night. It will be interesting to see what happens when the new ones hatch in a couple days.
     
  4. happyhens1972

    happyhens1972 Songster

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    Thanks guys x

    Cole D....at what age did you allow your turkeys to eat the normal chicken layer's pellets and what were they on before that?

    Doop....can you clarify what 'flock raiser' is as we have different terms in the UK....is that the equivalent to 'growers pellet' here? Those are for birds of between 6 and 14 weeks. Or is it 'finishing pellets' for birds of 15 to 22 weeks or is it just another name for Layers' pellet'...designed for chickens of 22 weeks or POL?

    I appreciate the help, both of you, and sorry for the questions but I want to make sure the turkeys have the necessary nutrition for healthy growth whilst still catering for my chooks x
     
  5. doop

    doop In the Brooder

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    n.e minnesota
    Flock raiser is for a mixed flock. It has a higher protein%and doesn't have the high calcium that layer feed does.I've fed them all layer, but they seem to do better on flock raiser.do a search for Purina o nutrena flock raiser and see if you can find something comparable.if I'm not mistaken the higher calcium intake for birds not laying isn't healthy for them, but during laying season is fine.I forgot to add that I give my poults 27% protein game bird starter til twelve weeks.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2013
  6. hessclan6

    hessclan6 In the Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2013
    Pennsylvania
  7. Cole D

    Cole D In the Brooder

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    I start turkeys on game bird crumbles and after about two weeks switch to chick starter. I don't really keep track of when I switch them. When I think they are big enough I pit some pellets on top of the chick starter and if they eat the pellets you can switch their feed.
     

  8. happyhens1972

    happyhens1972 Songster

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    Thanks for your help guys, I shall do some research and comparisons to what is available here as we don't seem to have flock raiser in the UK.
     

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