Tylan 50 Injectables question

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by DelawareSilkie, Sep 10, 2010.

  1. ultasol

    ultasol Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 30, 2009
    SE Washington
    I second chickbird. Antibiotics have a use, and it is to treat acute infections susceptible to that particular medicine. They are not made for long term usage, and if you have had to use it for four months straight in order to keep your birds healthy you need to seek help from your vet, state vet, or elsewhere as what you are doing is not solving the problem. By dosing with tylan long term, you can be creating antibiotic resistant microbes that could be the source of a more widespread problem.

    Please, be careful. Antibiotics are a precious resource, and are very vunerable to misuse. Baytril was pulled to vet use only due to concerns over misuse and overuse leading to resistance. R&D money is not going to antibiotics as much as it is to other drugs, and it may be quite awhile before we see antibiotics with different modes of action hit the market.
     
  2. Kasia

    Kasia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    New Orleans
    We run a bird rescue and have 101 chickens, over 40 ducks and several birds. So we use it for different reasons, respiratory, coughing, ear infections, etc. And the amount depends on how much the bird needing it weighs. We inject it into the chest muscle, alternating sides each time, and use a diabetic syringe and needle so they don't even flinch. Before I started doing injections, I was giving them Baytril tablets by mouth.
     
  3. Kasia

    Kasia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 9, 2007
    New Orleans
    Quote:We run a bird rescue and have new rescues coming in daily, so it's not the same ones getting antibiotics. When I said I've been doing injections for 4 months, I didn't mean it to sound like I was dosing the same ones over and over for 4 months. Gosh no! I just meant that we have had a lot of really sick rescues come in and instead of dosing them with pills, I found that injections are much easier.

    I myself don't even take any antibiotics because I'd rather my body fight an infection on its own. But last time my doctor prescribed antibiotics for a cold, and I didn't take them, I ended up with pneumonia so I have to be more careful.
     
  4. susanbird

    susanbird Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 13, 2011
    Hi All,

    I have some chickens that have the "sniffles". Tractor Supply here is out of Tylan 50 but has Tylan 200 in stock. Can Tylan 200 be used? and if so what would the dosage be?

    Thanks, Susan
     
  5. tmasker

    tmasker Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Central Florida
    Hello! I have a young 14 ounce Frizzle Bantam pullet who developed swollen eyes in just two days. I felt horrible! I started to research how to put her down humanly. I tried some Durramycin (sp?) in the water and Vetrycin gel in each eye. No luck. After posting "Help!" as a post I received advice to use the Tylan 50. I injected her on Saturday (yesterday) and can see improvements already. Now her sister is starting to rattle with her breathing. This is a photo before. I hope to have some good photos to post soon! I purchased these two girls two weeks ago at a Farmer's Market and have grown to love them. Thanks goodness for this website. It has been many a sleepless night! [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Frosty

    Frosty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 30, 2008
    ND
    Quote:If the antibiotic in question is Tylan, I doubt humans would get it injected into the muscle either. It says right in the instructions that come with it that it causes permanent muscle damage. There are limits on how much per injection site for swine. For the two or three times in 10 years that I had to use it, I injected right into the sinus cavity.
     
    Nikkijo and MrsMellyB like this.
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Jacksonville, Florida
    Quote:If the antibiotic in question is Tylan, I doubt humans would get it injected into the muscle either. It says right in the instructions that come with it that it causes permanent muscle damage. There are limits on how much per injection site for swine. For the two or three times in 10 years that I had to use it, I injected right into the sinus cavity.

    x2 It can be given orally also, but for a longer duration because it doesnt absorb too well in their system. However, injecting is best for quickest treatment/recovery times. It's best to inject into either side of the breast muscle...the left side one day, the right side the next day etc...
    Tmasker. I hope you have your 2 infected bantam frizzles seperated far away from your other birds. Remember biosecurity.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2011
  8. susanbird

    susanbird Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 13, 2011
    Quote:If the antibiotic in question is Tylan, I doubt humans would get it injected into the muscle either. It says right in the instructions that come with it that it causes permanent muscle damage. There are limits on how much per injection site for swine. For the two or three times in 10 years that I had to use it, I injected right into the sinus cavity.

    Question about injection into sinus cavity. Using the picture of the chicken on this page would you just put drops in the nares or actually put the needle through the covering of the nares and inject the Tylan. Or do you mean something else? I have been injecting the Tylan 50 under the skin in the breast area. Susan
     
  9. tmasker

    tmasker Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Central Florida
    Quote:If the antibiotic in question is Tylan, I doubt humans would get it injected into the muscle either. It says right in the instructions that come with it that it causes permanent muscle damage. There are limits on how much per injection site for swine. For the two or three times in 10 years that I had to use it, I injected right into the sinus cavity.

    x2 It can be given orally also, but for a longer duration because it doesnt absorb too well in their system. However, injecting is best for quickest treatment/recovery times. It's best to inject into either side of the breast muscle...the left side one day, the right side the next day etc...
    Tmasker. I hope you have your 2 infected bantam frizzles seperated far away from your other birds. Remember biosecurity.

    Dawg53... These two bantam frizzles were purchased two weeks ago at a Farmer's Market. I always isolate new chickens for at least a month and treat them with Diramycin in the water to make sure they are healthy. These two girls are housed in the screened back porch at least an acre away from the rest of my flock. I make sure no mosquitos can get to the new isolated chickens to keep anything from spreading. We make sure we was hands and clothes when handling the new chickens as well. After 4 days the one pictured developed the swollen eye and I started researching on the internet. I posted her photo on Backyard Chickens and received no advice until Saturday when I tried injecting the Tylan 50 under the skin of the Frizzle. I have followed the treatment and her eyes are starting to look better. I never thought of injecting the Tylan directly into the sinus cavity. How much do I use and how deep can it be injected?
    I am really considering putting her down since I am just not sure what she has and if she is a carrier. Now her sister is developing lesions her mouth (Wet Fowl Pox?) and is having a difficult time eating. Don't know if I should take a chance with these two Frizzles. The black one with the swollen eyes is 14 oz. and her sister is 1 lb 2 oz. I am really concerned that they are suffering. ANY and ALL suggestions are welcomed! [​IMG]
     
  10. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Jacksonville, Florida
    Tylan 50 injectable dosing for your small birds is 1/4cc for 3 days if injecting, 5 days if you slowly squirt it into the nostrils, orally as well. Your birds will remain carriers and you risk the chance of spreading it to your seperated birds...even on your clothes/hands after handling the sick frizzles. Lesions in the mouth could be wet pox or possibly canker. I believe their quality of life is seriously in question and I recommend that you cull both of them and disinfect everything they were in contact with....it's your choice. Good luck.
     

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