Type of ventilation

CCDC

Chirping
7 Years
Dec 31, 2012
8
12
72
Grantsville, UT
I opted for a pre-fab coop after a recent move. It's no surprise that is has inadequate ventilation! This is the coop - smaller then it looks, of course! We'll only have 3 chickens so it should be fine. The actual coop is approx 2x3. I'll be adding additional run space and making some other modifications, including adding vents.

Coop.png
Interior.png


There are two "human" doors, as well as the chicken door. I plan to cover one of the doors with hardware cloth and keep it open during the day. I'll need additional venting - especially in the winter when the doors are closed. I'm wondering about the following type of soffit vent. One on each end under the eaves. They're 16x6. It seems like these would help keep rain out better than simply drilling holes.
soffit-vents-84217-64_1000.jpg

What are your thoughts? Other ideas?
 

Ruthster55

Crowing
7 Years
Nov 23, 2013
1,063
1,952
391
Northern South America
Think about modifying both "human" doors so that they are more like a door-with-a-screen-door that can be opened in summer with just the hardware cloth covering it.

I didn't explain that very clearly, but the idea is that when it's hot, you would have both doors open for cross-ventilation but screened with hard ware cloth for security. When it's cold, you could have both doors closed.

Would need hardware cloth, hinges for the screen doors, hinges for the modified doors, and probably a couple of other things.
 

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aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
95,087
125,894
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
One on each end under the eaves. They're 16x6. It seems like these would help keep rain out better than simply drilling holes.
Yes, they would.
Will you put them on the gable ends?
1590702301821.png

You could tuck another vent under the run roof high up on coop wall.
Not sure that will be enough ventilation.

Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
1590702077089.png
 

CCDC

Chirping
7 Years
Dec 31, 2012
8
12
72
Grantsville, UT
Think about modifying both "human" doors so that they are more like a door-with-a-screen-door that can be opened in summer with just the hardware cloth covering it.

I didn't explain that very clearly, but the idea is that when it's hot, you would have both doors open for cross-ventilation but screened with hard ware cloth for security. When it's cold, you could have both doors closed.

Would need hardware cloth, hinges for the screen doors, hinges for the modified doors, and probably a couple of other things.
Great idea! Thanks!
 

CCDC

Chirping
7 Years
Dec 31, 2012
8
12
72
Grantsville, UT
Yes, they would.
Will you put them on the gable ends?
View attachment 2165077
You could tuck another vent under the run roof high up on coop wall.
Not sure that will be enough ventilation.

Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
View attachment 2165069
I'm identified now. :) Thanks for showing me how.
We've enjoyed keeping chickens in northern Utah with cold winters, and in the extreme south of the state with 100+ deg summers. We (and our chickens) have survived both extremes. I'm probably obsessing too much, but, I'd rather err on the side of obsession, rather then be too casual!
My carpentry tools/skills are limited, but, if I pick up a reciprocating saw, I think I can do "all of the above"!
Thanks again!
 

3KillerBs

Crossing the Road
11 Years
Jul 10, 2009
5,397
11,771
846
North Carolina Sandhills
My Coop
My Coop
but, if I pick up a reciprocating saw, I think I can do "all of the above"!

My husband calls me "The Tool Enabler" so I have to vote for buying a reciprocating saw. 😉

Be sure to pick up the correct blades for the kind of cutting you'll be doing. Having the right blade for the right job instead of trying to make one general purpose blade do everything makes the difference between easy and frustrating.
 

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