Ulcerative enteritis (Clostridium colinum) "quail disease"?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Fishman43, Sep 8, 2014.

  1. Fishman43

    Fishman43 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 10, 2010
    Durham
    In my quest to learn more and be prepared to be a better keeper of my still young and growing quail flock I read the "Common Gamebird Diseases" flier from Texas A&M (linked below). It mentions Ulcerative enteritis, (Clostridium colinum) "quail disease", as one of the most common for quail, and the symptoms seem to match what I recently had with my birds that I have been treating as coccidiosis.

    How common is "quail disease" and how should it be planned for/treated in the small home flock (I don't have a "ton" of feed or a way to mix measure and mix 200g of bacitracin into it).

    http://teamquail.tamu.edu/files/2010/09/Common_Gamebird_Diseases.pdf

    Thanks!
     
  2. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Both diseases are quite common. The file you linked is good for general understanding of disease (it's in my signature as well) but when it comes to treatment info I always use the poultry site.

    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/162/ulcerative-enteritis-quail-disease
     
  3. Fishman43

    Fishman43 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 10, 2010
    Durham
    So which do you then recomend from the preventative:

    "Infection-free birds, all-in/all-out production, low level antibiotics as per treatment, possibly probiotics."

    I bought in some eggs (the ones that hatched this weekend) to out cross into my exisiting birds so the all-in/all-out would be tough but doable...
     
  4. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I normally keep a closed system regarding my biosecurity and I've never encountered a poultry disease in my flock. Since I started raising quail I can count the number of live birds I've allowed on my property on one hand (wild birds notwithstanding of course). I'd say treat the birds or replace them with clean ones and don't bring any new birds in, only eggs, once you're sure you're disease free.
     

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