Can Ulcerative Enteritis in Coturnix Quail be passed on through eggs?

FiveFootmama

Chirping
5 Years
Apr 29, 2015
15
18
77
Hi,

I'm dealing with Ulcerative Enteritis in my quail aviary. I've lost about 4 birds in the last month, and just realized what the problem is after some serious research. The vet is ordering me some Duramycin to treat them with. Regardless of the illness, I've been planning to replace my flock later this Spring. Even with hours of research, I'm looking for more help.

First off, do I need to worry about the Duramycin affecting the hatching eggs? From what I read, it sounds like it doesn't affect most people. But my biggest concern- will the new quail babies get UE through the eggs? My findings look like it is only transmitted through feces and infected food and water, but not through eggs, correct?

What is going to be the best way to disinfect the coop and run (on the ground) between this current flock and the new one? I plan to remove all litter, scrub all surfaces thoroughly with soap and water until is sparkles (if wood can sparkle), and then spray everything down with a bleach solution. I'll bleach all feeders, waterers, and equipment. What's the best way to handle the ground underneath the run litter?

I've also read that Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylate powder can be added to their water to help prevent future outbreaks. Does this need to be used continuously or can it be added periodically once every couple of weeks (I read of a game farm that described this method)? It appears that BMD, if it were in eggs or meat, is generally safe for people with Sulfa allergies. No one in my family has an allergy, but I'd feel terrible about selling eggs that could potentially cause someone an allergic reaction.

Sorry for so many questions, but I'll take all of the help I can get!
 
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sylviethecochin

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Hello. I can't answer most of your questions, though when I searched "Ulcerative enteritis vertical transmission quail" nothing came up, so I think you can safely assume that it's oral only. (Any scientific paper worth the pixels it's printed on would have used those words.)
@JaeG , @TwoCrows and @007Sean are some of the best people on here for quail. @casportpony might know something as well, especially about medications and disinfectants.

Good luck.
 

FiveFootmama

Chirping
5 Years
Apr 29, 2015
15
18
77
Hello. I can't answer most of your questions, though when I searched "Ulcerative enteritis vertical transmission quail" nothing came up, so I think you can safely assume that it's oral only. (Any scientific paper worth the pixels it's printed on would have used those words.)
@JaeG , @TwoCrows and @007Sean are some of the best people on here for quail. @casportpony might know something as well, especially about medications and disinfectants.

Good luck.

Thanks for your help and your time! I didn't know to use the term 'vertical transmission' and instead had searched for every variation of 'UE transmission to eggs' possible. My scientist hubby got a laugh out of your 'worth the pixels it's printed on' comment, too. Thanks again.
 

FiveFootmama

Chirping
5 Years
Apr 29, 2015
15
18
77
This is not something I've had to deal with but I do know you can sterilize the outside of your eggs before incubation and in this instance it is probably a good idea to do so. Here's a good article explaining what to do:
https://poultrykeeper.com/incubating-and-hatching-eggs/how-to-clean-eggs-for-incubation/

I agree that sterilization of the eggshell is a great idea. I read through the link you posted. I do sterilize eggs before I incubate them normally, but use the more 'hillbilly' version of original gold Listerine mixed half and half with water in a spray bottle. Immediately after collection (which I do wearing rubber gloves or at least well washed hands) I just spray all sides of the the eggs and let it dry. Sometimes I repeat the routine as I'm placing them into the incubator too- the double whammy. I've gotten excellent hatch rates in the past since incorporating this into my routine.

Thank you for your time and your input!
 

TwoCrows

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Ulcerative Enteritis does not pass through into the egg from a sick hen or infected roo, rather this disease is contact to contact directly with infected birds and their environment. However survivors will pass antibodies into the egg to the embryo to make offspring more resistant.

I had this bacteria run through my aviaries many years ago, it kills fast. So get them on Duramycin quickly. Use distilled or RO water if your water is the least bit hard. Hard water renders Duramycin useless.

The survivors will develop immunity and as long as this bacteria doesn't completely overwhelm them again by introducing new birds with this disease, you shouldn't see it again. Just make sure to disinfect everything well....floors, water and feed dishes, remove and bedding, change dust bathes, grit or oyster shell needs to be replaced.

I do not recommend hatching eggs from birds that have been on antibiotics until the withdrawal period is over. And for Duramycin its 21 days. Antibiotics can, but not always, cause deformities and other health issues that could result in evental culling. I personally wait until meds are out of their systems.

Good luck, I hope your flock makes a complete recovery!
 

007Sean

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A long time ago in a county far away, I raised Bobwhites commercially. Around 5,000 birds a year. I had a tangle with Ulcerative Enteritis. Caused by Clostridium colinum, a very fastidious, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium. It is also thought to produce a toxin but that hasn't been proven as of yet. Bobwhite quail are highly susceptible to C. colinum.
At that time, Tetracycline was the drug of choice. Had to have a vet get the vials of tetracycline that was injectable, even though I didn't inject the birds, instead, I added it to their water via vet's direction. It nearly wiped me out before I got it under control. I think the drug of choice now days, is Bacitracin or Strepomycin, either drug can be given in the drinking water. Treated birds often have little resistance to reinfection. Clean water is the answer to the problem. It's caused by the birds drinking feces laiden water or feed but primaraly water. Another way to deter infection, is to raise the birds on wire. I raise mine on both wire and ground, and knock on wood, haven't had any problems since that time.
I'm not positive but I don't believe it can be passed to the egg. It has to be consumed orally. Disinfecting your pens, enclosures, waterers, feeders, etc is a good idea.
As with almost any drug, if unsure of a withholding time, withhold consumption of the eggs or meat.
As you stated, some people are sensitive to sulfa drugs, so better to be safe. I didn't have enough birds left to sell, just enough left for breeding stock, so didn't have to worry with a withholding time.
I don't subscribe to "washing eggs", I believe it removes the protective "bloom" that is present when the egg is laid. I know hatcheries, in general, do wash their eggs before incubation but I think it's more of a biosecurity measure on much greater scale than a hobbyist breeder needs to take into consideration.
I don't believe in medicated feed, either...therapeutic levels of medicated feed, ie; various antibiotics can lead to thrush or sour crop in quail, pheasants and grouse. Sure, feed manufactures promote it's use, because it sells. Their into the business of making money and don't necessarily have the consumers best interest in mind with their marketing practices.
 
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FiveFootmama

Chirping
5 Years
Apr 29, 2015
15
18
77
Ulcerative Enteritis does not pass through into the egg from a sick hen or infected roo, rather this disease is contact to contact directly with infected birds and their environment. However survivors will pass antibodies into the egg to the embryo to make offspring more resistant.

I had this bacteria run through my aviaries many years ago, it kills fast. So get them on Duramycin quickly. Use distilled or RO water if your water is the least bit hard. Hard water renders Duramycin useless.

The survivors will develop immunity and as long as this bacteria doesn't completely overwhelm them again by introducing new birds with this disease, you shouldn't see it again. Just make sure to disinfect everything well....floors, water and feed dishes, remove and bedding, change dust bathes, grit or oyster shell needs to be replaced.

I do not recommend hatching eggs from birds that have been on antibiotics until the withdrawal period is over. And for Duramycin its 21 days. Antibiotics can, but not always, cause deformities and other health issues that could result in evental culling. I personally wait until meds are out of their systems.

Good luck, I hope your flock makes a complete recovery!

Thanks for your reply! It's very encouraging to hear from other people who have dealt with this. I hadn't even thought about antibodies making the offspring more resistant to the illness. That's great news. My birds are now on the antibiotics and currently everyone looks good.
 

FiveFootmama

Chirping
5 Years
Apr 29, 2015
15
18
77
A long time ago in a county far away, I raised Bobwhites commercially. Around 5,000 birds a year. I had a tangle with Ulcerative Enteritis. Caused by Clostridium colinum, a very fastidious, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium. It is also thought to produce a toxin but that hasn't been proven as of yet. Bobwhite quail are highly susceptible to C. colinum.
At that time, Tetracycline was the drug of choice. Had to have a vet get the vials of tetracycline that was injectable, even though I didn't inject the birds, instead, I added it to their water via vet's direction. It nearly wiped me out before I got it under control. I think the drug of choice now days, is Bacitracin or Strepomycin, either drug can be given in the drinking water. Treated birds often have little resistance to reinfection. Clean water is the answer to the problem. It's caused by the birds drinking feces laiden water or feed but primaraly water. Another way to deter infection, is to raise the birds on wire. I raise mine on both wire and ground, and knock on wood, haven't had any problems since that time.
I'm not positive but I don't believe it can be passed to the egg. It has to be consumed orally. Disinfecting your pens, enclosures, waterers, feeders, etc is a good idea.
As with almost any drug, if unsure of a withholding time, withhold consumption of the eggs or meat.
As you stated, some people are sensitive to sulfa drugs, so better to be safe. I didn't have enough birds left to sell, just enough left for breeding stock, so didn't have to worry with a withholding time.
I don't subscribe to "washing eggs", I believe it removes the protective "bloom" that is present when the egg is laid. I know hatcheries, in general, do wash their eggs before incubation but I think it's more of a biosecurity measure on much greater scale than a hobbyist breeder needs to take into consideration.
I don't believe in medicated feed, either...therapeutic levels of medicated feed, ie; various antibiotics can lead to thrush or sour crop in quail, pheasants and grouse. Sure, feed manufactures promote it's use, because it sells. Their into the business of making money and don't necessarily have the consumers best interest in mind with their marketing practices.

Thanks for your help and input. I have them on antibiotics now and so far everyone looks good. This is the first time I've had to mediate them at all, and hopefully the last. I prefer to keep my feed unmedicated if at all possible.

Thanks again for your comments.
 

007Sean

Face it, Embrace it, Ace it, Replace it
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Oct 25, 2015
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South Central Texas
Thanks for your help and input. I have them on antibiotics now and so far everyone looks good. This is the first time I've had to mediate them at all, and hopefully the last. I prefer to keep my feed unmedicated if at all possible.

Thanks again for your comments.
Your very welcome!
 

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