Unhealthy Poo??

TMac76

In the Brooder
Jul 30, 2019
3
15
34
Looking for input/advice on possible issues with our rooster, Willie. He was acting off yesterday (was staying under coop more than usual but it was cool in the morning and rainy in the evening) and seemed to have a little bit of a wheeze yesterday evening. We decided to separate him, and brought him inside last night to observe/treat with vet ex and putting vitamins/electrolytes in his water. Also thought it would be good for him to simply rest comfortably. Wheezing seemed better this morning but we saw him poop the below and it didn't look normal to us. We were going to put him back outside this morning but after that, we put him back inside to stay for the day at least. Our chickens are about 16 1/2 weeks old so we just started on layer feed. I have heard/read mixed information on feeding roosters layer feed. Not sure if that could be issue if there is one. We are new with raising chickens so again, any input or advice is much appreciated.
 

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Eggcessive

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A good alternative would be to feed your chickens Flock Raiser which has much less calcium, more protein, and is good for all ages and roosters. His droppings look like he is not eating and drinking enough. If he is wheezing, he may have a respiratory illness. Has it been wet or moldy where he might have developed a respiratory fungal infection? If you have see any respiratory illness in the flock before, he may have been exposed by a carrier.

I would try to get him eating more, so you might want to ofer some feed mixed with a lot of water—just mix a small amount and change it daily. Add a tsp of plain yogurt or some buttermilkfor probiotics and flavor. Scrambled egg is usually a good treat, and tuna, salmon, or ground meat in small amounts are also good. A pate canned cat food might be another to try. While he is eating less, I would grind up a 1/4 tablet of human vitamin B complex into his food daily.

It might be good to give him a round of Corid (amprollium) in his water for 5-7 days. Dosage is 2 tsp of the liquid per gallon of water, and you cangive an additional 0.1 ml per pound of undiluted Corid twice a day to give a boost. Worming him with SafeGuard 1/4 ml per pound and repeat in 10 days would be another food treatment. Treating for coccidiosis and worms would rule out those two problems.

upload_2019-11-8_9-50-1.jpeg
 

TMac76

In the Brooder
Jul 30, 2019
3
15
34
A good alternative would be to feed your chickens Flock Raiser which has much less calcium, more protein, and is good for all ages and roosters. His droppings look like he is not eating and drinking enough. If he is wheezing, he may have a respiratory illness. Has it been wet or moldy where he might have developed a respiratory fungal infection? If you have see any respiratory illness in the flock before, he may have been exposed by a carrier.

I would try to get him eating more, so you might want to ofer some feed mixed with a lot of water—just mix a small amount and change it daily. Add a tsp of plain yogurt or some buttermilkfor probiotics and flavor. Scrambled egg is usually a good treat, and tuna, salmon, or ground meat in small amounts are also good. A pate canned cat food might be another to try. While he is eating less, I would grind up a 1/4 tablet of human vitamin B complex into his food daily.

It might be good to give him a round of Corid (amprollium) in his water for 5-7 days. Dosage is 2 tsp of the liquid per gallon of water, and you cangive an additional 0.1 ml per pound of undiluted Corid twice a day to give a boost. Worming him with SafeGuard 1/4 ml per pound and repeat in 10 days would be another food treatment. Treating for coccidiosis and worms would rule out those two problems.

View attachment 1954425
Thank you! When he was a chick, we thought he had a wheeze and treated him with the VetRx and that cleared that up. Other than that, we haven't experienced any respiratory illness in the flock before.

I have Corid in powder form so if there isn't any improvement when I get home, I will try that. It would probably be a good idea to treat our 9 other hens to be on the safe side?
 

Eggcessive

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Premium member
8 Years
Apr 3, 2011
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southern Ohio
The dosage for the Corid powder is 1 1/2 tsp per gallon. It won’t hurt the others to get the Corid if you wish. Most chickens at 4 1/2 months should have built up tolerance to coccidia in the soil, but some birds may have some immunity problems. It may be easier to treat all if you leave him with the others. Wheezing could be a sign of a respiratory disease. Look for any other signs, such as watery or bubbly eye, sneeze or cough, or gasping. Wet or moldy conditions or damp bedding could add to respiratory problems.
 
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