Venomous & nonvenomous snakes in the same area

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Steve_of_sandspoultry, Jun 15, 2009.

  1. WalkingWolf

    WalkingWolf Songster

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    Steve you have to be careful of copperheads if you own a dog, the dogs instinct is to go after it. I have had 3 dogs snake bit, luckily they survived, seems benadryl does a good job of stopping a reaction from a snake bite. I don't think it works that way for people though.
     
  2. ozark hen

    ozark hen Living My Dream

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    Quote:We used to have a standard size dachshund who jumped in front of me and took a copperhead bite on two different occasions...yes, I did not see it until after it struck!..both times the dog was bitten on the face. I freaked out and didn't have a vehicle nor a phone at the time. I had nothing to give the dog and cried as I thought I was going to lose him. In a few hours he was still swollen but happily greeted dh at the door when he returned from work. He was a tough little dog and died after living to a very old age. He was wonderful. I do not know this for a fact but....neighbors have told me I wouldn't have died from the bite but would need to go to dr. for treatment.
    I have always heard the same thing that you have Steve but dh was working around an old building here and lying within 3 or 4 ft from each other were a copperhead and a garden snake. Don't know what that means though??
     
  3. Faverolle

    Faverolle Songster

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    Quote:But will they occupy the same area? Just seems strange that when one showed up the others left. Or when I was in the feed barn today I haven't been seeing very much rodent sign - have the non venomous ones ate all there was to eat and moved on?

    Interesting creatures those snakes. [​IMG]

    Steve

    Steve,
    it's very common to see venomous and non venomous snakes in the same area. It basically depends more on the area in question as far as available habitat, variety of species, and then the abundance or lack there of in some cases of the species. In eastern NC you have a pretty good selection and also abundance of many species of reptiles. I was down in eastern NC a few weeks ago looking for snakes. What county are you in?
     
  4. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Crowing

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    have the non venomous ones ate all there was to eat and moved on?

    I think that's part of your answer right there​
     
  5. saddina

    saddina Internally Deranged

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    Quote:This sage advice brought to you by the colorblind guy..... [​IMG]
     
  6. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon

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    In Missouri, no person has died as a result of a copperhead bite. In an average year, venomous snakes bite approximately 200 people in this state, with the majority involving copperheads. In over 25 years there are no records of a person dying from the bite of any venomous snake species native to Missouri. A person bitten by a copperhead should be taken to the emergency room of the nearest hospital to prevent infection and reduce pain, not because he or she is going to die.

    From: http://mdc.mo.gov/conmag/1999/05/40.htm

    Copperhead
    poison, isn't such hot poison. We have our fair share, but the Speckled and Prairie Kings are more numerous (eat Copperheads like they were Slim Jims). We pretty much just kick them out of the way and let it go at that (they eat mice and, better yet, Voles).​
     
  7. lauralou

    lauralou Songster

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    Our last place was pretty much infested with copperheads. We also had a lot of blacksnakes there. And another species that I dubbed the Pink Bellied Dirt Snake. Very scientific of me, huh?. Lovely little things, those were.

    So I'd say YES, they can and will live in close proximity to one another.
     
  8. quiltnchik

    quiltnchik Songster

    May 19, 2009
    Virginia
    Quote:Aren't they WONDERFUL dogs?!? They've always been my absolute favorite breed and I still have one here, but he's a bit of a wimp because he was mistreated so badly before we got him 7 years ago. Dachshunds don't know their size and tend to take on things they have no business attempting to take on, though. [​IMG]

    Quote:Adult snakes can control their bites a lot better and will often give a "dry bite," more as a warning, since they know they can't eat you. However, young snakes can't control their venom as well and will almost always inject venom when they bite.
     
  9. quiltnchik

    quiltnchik Songster

    May 19, 2009
    Virginia
    Quote:We have those here (I also live in Virginia) and here's the info I found on them:

    Eastern Worm snake (Carphophis amoenus)

    Description: A small (up to 35 cm TL) and smooth wormlike burrowing snake with a brown back and pink belly. The pink color extends onto the first scale row. Habitat: Wooded areas, usually those with rocky soils.

    We find them around here all the time, including quite a few in our compost bin. However, we've had a few Garter Snakes back there feasting on the Worm Snakes as they were feasting on our compost worms! [​IMG]
     
  10. WalkingWolf

    WalkingWolf Songster

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    Quote:We have those here (I also live in Virginia) and here's the info I found on them:

    Eastern Worm snake (Carphophis amoenus)

    Description: A small (up to 35 cm TL) and smooth wormlike burrowing snake with a brown back and pink belly. The pink color extends onto the first scale row. Habitat: Wooded areas, usually those with rocky soils.

    We find them around here all the time, including quite a few in our compost bin. However, we've had a few Garter Snakes back there feasting on the Worm Snakes as they were feasting on our compost worms! [​IMG]

    My chickens ate one of those last night, it tried laying still but I kept poking it until it moved. That was all it took for them to spot it.
     

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