What breed/gender are THESE?

maijuub92

In the Brooder
6 Years
Apr 21, 2013
92
0
29
North-East Georgia In a SMALL town
I'm going to be upfront, I am knew to BYC AND raising chickens. Please be patient with me. Though I have done a lot of research. It will be a while until I get things down.

I have 5 total chicks at 6 weeks. 2 that are I'm almost 100% sure are Buff OP 1 is a roo, 1 I had initially thought was a Buff OP but I'm not so sure at this point it started getting dark spots in the tail feathers, and 1 that I'm starting to think is a EE but was hoping is was a Ameraucana, And the last one ? Is the light brown one a couple of pics below.

I bought the 2 golden ones and copper colored 1 at a local feed and seed store at 3 weeks old. Here are the pics at 3 weeks with just the first 3 that I thought were all Buff OP.




Here are all of them at all of them at 4 weeks old. They were "from" a hatchery in south Georgia. But like I said, I had bought them from a local feed and seed sore.




Here they are at 6 weeks.




And finally the one I think is a EE, but they sold them as Ameraucanas. As I've heard many people do.






Please ask questions, and tell me how or if I should take more pics.
 

countrygoddess

Songster
11 Years
Nov 16, 2008
850
46
178
Champlain Valley, Vermont
My guess about the golden ones would be that since they were sold at a feed store, they are most likely a sex link, such as Golden Comet. And you're probably right that the Ameraucana is an Easter Egger. I glanced at the list of chicks one can order at one of our local feed stores last week and saw that they listed "Araucanas" as one of them. I highly doubt that. I'm sure they're Easter Eggers--that's generally what feed stores sell.
 

popsicle

Songster
8 Years
Oct 27, 2011
1,799
138
231
Looking at the mountains in MT
I agree, that's an Easter Egger--she'll probably give you pretty eggs so don't be too upset.

It does look like two Buff Orpingtons, can't tell about the third. What color are the legs? If pink, probably a darker Buff Orpington. If yellow perhaps a light hatchery-type New Hampshire or one of the many varieties of Red Sex Link (like the golden comet mentioned above).

The brown one could be a Welsummer or Brown Leghorn.
 
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maijuub92

In the Brooder
6 Years
Apr 21, 2013
92
0
29
North-East Georgia In a SMALL town
I will get some better pics of them singled out and close up tomorrow. The golden ones have really fluffy bottoms but I am not sure as to how much that matters as to what breed they are. Here is a pic of the two. One of them is surely a roo, the other I'm hoping is a hen. "She" has a lighter colored comb while the other is red and herds the others around at times.

 

maijuub92

In the Brooder
6 Years
Apr 21, 2013
92
0
29
North-East Georgia In a SMALL town
All of my pics the copper colored one is hiding her legs. I would go check right now but the girls are sleeping. I'm not so much upset as to the breeds really. But would like to breed them when they get older and just need to figure out what they truly are before that time comes around so I know what I'm getting into. The golden roo "Chuck" is a little upset since I just bought 2 knew older BLR Wyandotte hens. I only have one coop at the moment so they are all together in there now. I hope thats ok?
 

popsicle

Songster
8 Years
Oct 27, 2011
1,799
138
231
Looking at the mountains in MT
I think you do have a pair of Buff Orpingtons. If the third buff/orange bird is the one you're referring to as Chuck and it is a cockerel, it's not a Red Sex Link.

Most people would say that you should quarantine new birds, but if you've already put them together then what's done is done. Keep an eye on ALL the birds to make sure they don't become ill (watch for swollen face, weepy eyes, etc). I always quarantine now because a few years ago I got some older hens that had coryza--fortunately I only lost one of that batch of new hens.

I don't think the hens will hurt him much if they haven't already. They'll have to work through their pecking-order issues eventually anyways. I put five 5-week old chicks in with my old birds--mostly because some of the young birds escaped and joined the old birds without much incident (my toddler leaves the grow-out-pen door open). The young birds are much quicker and are able to fly better than my fat old birds. So the young cock should be able to get away from a couple older Wyandottes.

I know lots of people are way more uptight about introducing birds and all that. I always find it's really easy to make detailed plans, but the chickens usually have plans of their own.
 
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maijuub92

In the Brooder
6 Years
Apr 21, 2013
92
0
29
North-East Georgia In a SMALL town
Here are a couple more of the copper colored one, "Strudel".
400
 

maijuub92

In the Brooder
6 Years
Apr 21, 2013
92
0
29
North-East Georgia In a SMALL town
Here is the other of the copper colored one, "Strudel".
400


Some more of the brown one Fortune that popsicle said might be a Welsummer. I think that's right.
My female Buff Orp in the front "peeping" at the camera. All of the babies except Fortune are very friendly and photogenic.
400
 

maijuub92

In the Brooder
6 Years
Apr 21, 2013
92
0
29
North-East Georgia In a SMALL town
Here are the two BLR Wyandottes. First the young one. Hoping its a hen, still not sure though.
400

400


This is the older one. Her legs are a little pale. Someone I know had told me that if the legs start to look like they were bleached that could mean they are past laying age. The person I had bought them from got them at a auction for me. So I'm not sure how its all going to work out. I would have liked to keep them seperated until I knew that they were fine, but it was a spur of the moment kinda thing and I didn't have time to get it set up.
400

400


Thank-you everyone that helps out.
 

MANNA-PRO

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