what breed of rabbit is this

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by karhernandez33, Sep 7, 2013.

  1. karhernandez33

    karhernandez33 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  2. karhernandez33

    karhernandez33 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She has very small ears and short mouth
     
  3. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    My first thought is a Broken Black Netherland Dwarf. A lot of the Broken Dwarfs have barely more color on them than the Dwarf Hotots.
     
  4. Mickey Lou 04

    Mickey Lou 04 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hard to tell if it's netherland or polish. I usually tell by their type. I think polish come in broken black as well. And I believe every breed that comes in broken markings also has charlies. (broken with very little coloring)
     
  5. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    Naturally, since a Charlie is a rabbit that has two copies of the broken gene. The nose marking on this rabbit looks more like a very unbalanced nose marking, and is more than I'd expect to see on a Charlie. I have owned several broken Dwarfs that had a solid parent, so they couldn't possibly be Charlies, that had no more color than this rabbit.

    I agree, the pics don't show the details of type that make it clear one way or the other; this rabbit could even be a mix of the dwarf breeds.
     
  6. karhernandez33

    karhernandez33 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the info. My brother got her from a pet store.
     
  7. Mickey Lou 04

    Mickey Lou 04 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was always told that charlies were rabbits that didn't have enough color on them such as mini rex. I believe they have to have 75/80% of their bodies colored when talking about brokens.
     
  8. Angie Poo

    Angie Poo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    More then likely since she is from a pet store she is a mix breed dwarf. Most pet stores sell mix breed dwarf or lop rabbits.

    Charlie's are rabbits that do not have enough color to be shown. True charlies have 2 copies of the broken gene where as false charlies only have 1 copy of the broken gene. In mini rex they have to have at least 20% color and no more then 50% color (more then that is considered booted). I'm not sure about other breeds though.
     
  9. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    The broken gene's action is cumulative, meaning that two copies results in a greater impact on the rabbit's coat color than that of one copy of the broken gene and one of the non-broken gene. There are also a bunch of modifying genes that fine-tune just how the broken gene is expressed, which is how you can get a mostly-white rabbit that really has only one copy of the broken gene. It's a nuisance if you are trying for showable brokens, because (as others have said) the breed standards generally want more color in the coat.

    "Charlies" got their name from the fact that the rabbits with two copies of the broken gene usually have very little in the way of a nose marking, if anything. Rather than a full butterfly, they usually have only a tiny mark near the nose, which reminded someone of the mustache of silent-film star Charlie Chaplin. The dark side of Charlies is that the broken gene also influences gut motility (the rate at which the digestive system processes food). Every rabbit with the broken gene has a digestive system that runs a bit slower than that of solid-colored rabbits. In a single-copy broken, the difference is slight, but the digestive systems of Charlies go a good bit slower. Any rabbit can get hit with GI stasis (basically, a digestive system that stops working entirely) but the tendency is much greater in Charlies. You can often spot the slow-running digestive action of a "true" Charlie by the irregular size and shape of the feces. Normal "bunny berries" are the same size, round, slightly flattened - rather like M & M's. A Charlie's poop is more like the peanut M & M's. With a rabbit like that, it is critical that they have plenty of fiber and water all the time, because they are more likely to get into digestive trouble than rabbits with normal digestive systems.
     

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