What breeds should I get?

MamaGrizzly

In the Brooder
Aug 10, 2020
32
40
36
I would build your own coop.
It’s not worth it to buy a shed or a pre made coop.
It’s a lot easier than some think and if you need help or advice you can always send me a message.
Making your own will cost time and some money, but buying one will cost time and a lot more money.
Imagine you have 1000$ to spend on a coop. Buying one you can get one big enough for maybe 10-15 birds.
Build your own though, and you could afford a coop to fit 50 birds and an enclosed run (minus cost of fencing)
I would definitely love some advice. My husband and I are planning to build the coop. I’m working on ideas and plans now. How big should I make the coop and run? Let’s say I might want more than 16 down the road lol. I’ve read a lot, but there are so many choices. What is something you’d not want to be without? What extras would you go for? How do you keep costs down? I feel like the way I’m going I’ll have a $2500 coop for 10 chicken 🤦🏻‍♀️
 

MamaGrizzly

In the Brooder
Aug 10, 2020
32
40
36
Here's some from my flock. I haven't raised a single one and my flock has grown from 4 to almost a dozen plus ones I don't keep
They are so beautiful! That roo is a stunner. What is his temperament like? I wouldn’t mind a rooster but I worry about aggression. I think our space is big enough for one.
 

MamaGrizzly

In the Brooder
Aug 10, 2020
32
40
36
I have just 3 buff orpingtons. They have been great! Super friendly with kids/families, easy to “train” and started laying at only 4.5 months old! I live in the Midwest and have cold winters and HOT summers. The hens have done great this summer. I obviously make sure there’s plenty of water. We’ll see how the winter goes, but from my research, they are fairly cold hardy.
Awe they are such cuties!
 

MamaGrizzly

In the Brooder
Aug 10, 2020
32
40
36
I would personally suggest a Columbian Wyandotte and a white leghorn. Personally for me, they have always been very friendly chickens and are good layers. Maybe also get a rooster if where you live permits it. Have fun raising chickens!
Thank you!! Are there any breeds that the rooster is less prone to aggression?
 

RW1984

Chirping
Aug 14, 2020
191
279
80
I would definitely love some advice. My husband and I are planning to build the coop. I’m working on ideas and plans now. How big should I make the coop and run? Let’s say I might want more than 16 down the road lol. I’ve read a lot, but there are so many choices. What is something you’d not want to be without? What extras would you go for? How do you keep costs down? I feel like the way I’m going I’ll have a $2500 coop for 10 chicken 🤦🏻‍♀️
I’ll send y’all a message
 

GoYaya

Chirping
Jul 20, 2020
64
107
66
Thank you!! Are there any breeds that the rooster is less prone to aggression?
I personally have had a really good experience with my leghorn rooster. If you are going to get them as chicks, I would recommend spending as much time with your roosters as possible. I have personally only had one mean rooster who was a bantam but he was always very skittish mean and we got him when he was about 20 weeks old. I also really like a Ameraucana or Polish rooster.
 

JacinLarkwell

Crowing
Mar 19, 2020
5,259
6,985
381
South-Eastern Montana
They are so beautiful! That roo is a stunner. What is his temperament like? I wouldn’t mind a rooster but I worry about aggression. I think our space is big enough for one.
He's a sweetheart. He was a tethered breeder before I hot him, but he loves being able to run around and be the main male. As long as I'm not actively hunting a girl of his, he let's us do whatever, even catch him when he gets string around his feet. We have lost one bird to predators (apart from a dog that got a special needs male) in years since we got them. We know he keeps then safe from predators and he's a great dad. Loves the chicks and tidbits from day one.
 

MamaGrizzly

In the Brooder
Aug 10, 2020
32
40
36
He's a sweetheart. He was a tethered breeder before I hot him, but he loves being able to run around and be the main male. As long as I'm not actively hunting a girl of his, he let's us do whatever, even catch him when he gets string around his feet. We have lost one bird to predators (apart from a dog that got a special needs male) in years since we got them. We know he keeps then safe from predators and he's a great dad. Loves the chicks and tidbits from day one.
That’s amazing
 

NatJ

Crowing
Mar 20, 2017
4,092
6,887
406
USA
I would definitely love some advice. My husband and I are planning to build the coop. I’m working on ideas and plans now. How big should I make the coop and run? Let’s say I might want more than 16 down the road lol.
Plan on 4 square feet of floor area per chicken in the coop, and 10 square feet per chicken in the run. More space fine, less is not. Most styles of feeder and waterer take up space too, so allow a few square feet for them.

It is usually best if you can walk into the coop easily--so make the door big enough, the roof high enough, and so forth.

Plan on 1 linear foot of roost per chicken. Chickens like to roost on the highest available thing. So make sure the roosts are higher than the nests, higher than the feeder, and so forth. Don't make the roosts too skinny. A closet rod or a 2x4 can make good roosts. (People dispute whether the 2x4 should have the 2" side up or the 4" side up. Each side says their chickens are doing fine.)

Nests are often about 1 foot each way (length, width, height). Plan for about one nest per four hens. Nests can be above the floor (so they do not take up floor space), but make sure there is a board or perch in front for the hens to fly to, so they can step gently into the nests without breaking eggs.

Think about bringing bedding in, and cleaning it out. Can you use a long-handled rake or pitchfork without bumping the wall? Can you bring a wheelbarrow in? Or at least put it near the door?

Think about bedding piled on the floor and scratched around by chickens: you probably want the door to swing outward, to be sure you can open it to go in! And you might want a board across the bottom of the doorway to keep the bedding from falling out. But you want that board to be easy to remove at cleaning time (maybe one screw in each end.)

It is convenient if you can make a smaller coop within the bigger one (section off one end, or a space under the nests, or something like that. The smaller coop can be used for brooding chicks, for isolating a bully or a victim, for letting a broody hen hatch her eggs in peace, for introducing new birds to the flock, and many other things.

Natural light is good, therefore windows are good.

Ventilation is very important, but fasten hardware cloth over openings to keep out predators. You could even consider making one or two walls entirely covered in hardware cloth instead of solid material, for summer ventilation; and then have panels or tarps that can be put up to block wind for winter.

Some predators can go through small openings (weasels), some can reach through small openings to grab chickens and rip them to pieces (raccoons), some are strong enough to rip off hardware cloth that was stapled in place (raccoons, dogs), some dig, some climb, some fly. And then there are bears, that can just rip apart anything you've built. Learning what predators are common in your area can help you design an appropriately strong coop.

If you do not know what predators are in your area, I would build for dogs and raccoons and hope for the best. Dogs dig and some are fairly strong, raccoons climb and can reach through small holes and crawl through medium holes. If you exclude those two creatures, you will probably keep out almost all other predators too, except possibly bears.

I've probably missed a few points, but those are what I see as the basics.

My personal favorite coop was 12 feet by 12 feet inside. The ceiling was 8 feet at the low side and 12 feet at the high side. It had double doors (4-foot total opening) on each end. The top of the nestboxes was right under a glass window, so the chickens could stand there and look out. It was in Alaska, so the chickens had to stay inside all winter, which made all that space really useful.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom