What breeds to use for hatching eggs?

Discussion in 'Chicken Breeders & Hatcheries' started by ktg 100, Feb 8, 2014.

  1. ktg 100

    ktg 100 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm going to build a new run for a few pure breed chickens I was wondering what type,
    I'd like to make some money off hatching eggs to pay the feed bill.
    I don't want them to be to hard to keep but I'll go to some what of a length for their extra needs.
    [Also they may have to share the run with three or four ducks but this can be changed]
    Thanks.
     
  2. LTygress

    LTygress Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Why exactly are you getting the chickens themselves? For pets? For meat? Or for eating their eggs?

    If you're getting them for eating their eggs yourself, and/or for meat, you'll want large fowl. In that case I would suggest easter eggers. Those green and blue eggs sell REAL easily!

    If you're wanting them for pets, I suggest silkies. Silkies are in high demand, but obviously as a bantam, you won't get much in the way of meat or eggs to eat.


    It's usually best to answer the question of why you want the CHICKEN, before you try to make them self-sustainable. Although chances are, you're going to put a lot more in to them, than the sale of hatching eggs will bring back.
     
  3. ktg 100

    ktg 100 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'd like to have them for show maybe and also for pets.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2014
  4. ktg 100

    ktg 100 Out Of The Brooder

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    Are Silkies as hard to mind and as delicate as people say because the weather can
    get quite wet and windy in the winter were I live.
     
  5. jonsccm

    jonsccm Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have ordered some lavender orpingtons to start a breeding project. The reason I chose them is that I live in a residential area outside of city limits. I needed a docile breed that was not flighty. I also have some silkie chicks coming next week. You may need to check what is popular in your area. Silkies might sell good one place and not another.
    You might start with a few breeds and as they mature share lots of photos on social network and see what attracts the most attention, not just photos but let them know how many eggs your getting what happened at the last poultry show you went to. Things like that. You can also get a tast of what they want by going to the shows and seeing what people are most interested in.
    After all that narrow down some options and chose one that you love. If you don't care for the breed it's going to be a boring project.
    If you have space you can breed a few breeds. If space is limited you may start with a few breeds and see what you like best then you get rid of the breeds you don't want and expand the one you do.
     
  6. ktg 100

    ktg 100 Out Of The Brooder

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    What would yous recommend for a beginners ornamental breed.
     
  7. jonsccm

    jonsccm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Can you be more specific? A lot of ordamental breeds are not known to be the best layers but can be great eye candy. While you may sell them well at first the local market can be satisfied sometimes quickly. It depends on the area. Those birds also tend to be a bit flighty from people I have talked to. Seabrights, D'uccles, Silkies, and Polish are all popular tho I have not raised them. I am getting silkies as brooder hens. I am looking at mottled cochin bantams for brooders and to possibly sell but I am not sure yet. They are not as exotic as seabrights but not as flighty so they might be better for me.
    In my opinion from what I have seen the breeds that sell are the dual purpose breeds. People allways need to replace ageing layers. Rocks, RIR, Sexlinks, Austrolorps, and Orpingtons, allways sell.
    If you want rare, then get into somthithing that almost no one has. Jubilee orpingtons are newly re-imported into the US and have gotten a bit of attention. I just can't justify the cost of good chicks.
    The way my mind works is if you plan to try to make a little extra money without putting tons of upkeep work into it then have what people need. Not what people want. They need food. They want a exotic show bird.
    I could be totally wrong on this is just my own opinion. I would try to get to a show and talk to some breeders in your local area. And hopefully others will get on here and give you other opinions so you get a chance to see things from othe sides and make a choice that is best for your situation.
    And don't rush into it. Take your time and research. Hope this helps.
     
  8. ktg 100

    ktg 100 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks I'll probably go to a show like you suggested,
    I'm going for a showy breed that's some what hardy [I don't mind if they don't lay that well]. I like the look of Silkies.
    I think their a good choice those any have any info on them or more
    suggestion.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2014
  9. LTygress

    LTygress Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Another good choice, if you're going for looks, might be a Frizzle. But you have to understand how that gene works, first. Then you have to be willing to accept only 50% of the offspring having feathers like that. The other 50% will be plain chickens. The most popular breed for them right now is Bantam Cochin. I'll be working to out-cross them to other breeds soon, but haven't even started yet. So if that's what you get, you'll have 50% bantam cochin FRIZZLE, and 50% plain bantam cochin.

    The advantage is that frizzles are still fairly new to the market. MOST of the people around me - even those who have dealt extensively with silkies - haven't seen nor touched a Frizzle in person. And the curly feathers are deceivingly SOFT. It looks like the chicken would be rough to the touch, but petting one is like petting velvet.

    HOWEVER, being so new to the market means you could get a HUGE RUSH of people wanting them and then.... nothing.
     
  10. jonsccm

    jonsccm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Silkies may be a good choice. For an ornamental breed they are probably one of the few that are docile and friendly, they don't really fly, and make great mothers.
    The cons are that they are a bit more fragile than other chickens, they don't fly and their vision is impaired due to the fuzzy feathers around the rise making them vulnerable to predators, and because they are starting to be more popular they are harder to show. Instead of having to beat out one or two other chickens, you need to beat out several. But most people just want them for pets. They like the fact that they are friendly, and seem to be part of the family. They are easy to keep in your backyard,
    Some new exotic breeds will gain popularity very quickly for the first 3 to 6 years and then fade out. But silkies have gained popularity slowly and seem to have a consistent demand in most areas.
     

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