what can cause a comb to turn blueish?

21hens-incharge

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I lost a buff orpington about 2 weeks ago. She had broken her leg almost 8 months ago and never fully recovered. Perhaps she died from that or perhaps it is related to what is going on now. She was treated for the leg but never got around well afterwards. She seemed thin when she passed.

Now I have a Delaware who is acting listless and her comb is blueish. She is 2 and a half years old. Eating and drinking but not as spry as normal. For the last 2 nights she has tucked herself in the corner at night instead of roosting with the others.

Worms are a possibility since they were digging in the garden eating all sorts of bugs a few weeks ago.
But would it make her comb turn blue?

Advise appreciated on what it could possibly be.
 

Judy

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The two illnesses, I would guess, aren't related. The blue comb is caused by a decreased oxygen supply to the comb. This can have many causes, possibly including worms, but also things like a heart problem, etc. Here are some good links about worming, if you decide to do this. (I use Valbazen, once a year, myself.) The first link talks about the symptoms of worms, see post #7.

https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/...solated-rarely-moving-bird/0_20#post_13176194

https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/...-i-wait-after-using-wazine/0_20#post_12410869
 

21hens-incharge

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Thank you for the link. I have been reading and reading and it seems that worms make them go pale not so much blue.
I went out earlier and cleaned every inch of the coop carefully watching for anything odd in the poo and found only normal poo.
Stood in the run waiting for her to poo and it too was normal looking. Nothing icky in it except poo.
Everyone else looks and acts fine.
I keep reminding myself that just because some chickens live a long time it does not mean all do.

She was a very small chick when she was young only half the size of the other delawares of the same age. Now she is one of the largest hens in the coop. Perhaps it is a heart problem.
I am nervous about giving medication to an already compromised hen not knowing if it is the right medication.
I did find Dawgs posts very informative in several threads. Thank you again for the links.

Oh by the way there are 20 hens total and only the one looking peckish. (discounting the one that passed)
 

cafarmgirl

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When you say she is now one of the largest hens in the coop what do you mean? Just size in general or weight? Does she feel swollen in her lower body/abdomen? Sometimes heart/circulatory problems result in ascites, fluid build up in the body cavities. But it can also go the other way around, ascites caused by some other problem can cause a slow down in the circulatory system and the blue comb.

If they are 2 1/2 and have never been dewormed I would definitely do that. I use Valbazen as well, very safe, very effective. I deworm my birds twice a year. Whether or not to deworm the one who is not feeling well.....I probably would. If she's full of worms that needs to be corrected. I suspect she probably has something else going on but a worm load will further weaken her.
 

21hens-incharge

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By saying she is one of the largest I do not mean disproportionate. She is one of the largest in overall size. Up until a couple days ago she was doing very well. She is just a big girl in that she is the same size or even a bit larger than the BA's and the BO's. I would put her weight at a solid 6.5 pounds. No drop in weight and no odd squishy feeling areas on her anywhere.
She is extremely friendly and easily handled so checking her over did not seem to bother her a bit.
Valbazen is hard to find close by here. I work about 30 miles from home and there is a ranch supply store on the way. I am going to check them on the way in tomorrow.
Sad to see her in this state. I want to have done all that I can for her.
So far no one is picking on her.
I do have a medium dog crate I can put her in if needed.
 

ChickensAreSweet

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Thank you for the link. I have been reading and reading and it seems that worms make them go pale not so much blue.
I went out earlier and cleaned every inch of the coop carefully watching for anything odd in the poo and found only normal poo.
Stood in the run waiting for her to poo and it too was normal looking. Nothing icky in it except poo.
Everyone else looks and acts fine.
I keep reminding myself that just because some chickens live a long time it does not mean all do.

She was a very small chick when she was young only half the size of the other delawares of the same age. Now she is one of the largest hens in the coop. Perhaps it is a heart problem.
I am nervous about giving medication to an already compromised hen not knowing if it is the right medication.
I did find Dawgs posts very informative in several threads. Thank you again for the links.

Oh by the way there are 20 hens total and only the one looking peckish. (discounting the one that passed)
With my own eyes I saw worms kill a chicken of mine, and he had a blue comb. I treated them too late.
 

21hens-incharge

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I used the Fenbendazole since I could not find any store that carries the Albendazole.
It was pretty easy to get them to eat it. I put it on top of individual dishes of oatmeal ( their favorite treat ).
Each chicken was fed alone and with some minor hesitation since they were isolated when getting it they all ate every bit.
I will now be keeping them on a worming schedule and will order Valbazen.

It was so sad when I went to close the coop for the night my gal with the blue comb was in the corner again. There were no
shavings around her. I moved her out to add a pile for her and she climbed into my lap for a bit. Poor thing. I hope this works.
She is one of the friendliest and certainly a favorite here.
I did read that the fenbendazole is not the best but it has to be better than nothing.

I do have some rooster booster vitamin b12 with vitamin K. I would like to give them some to help boost them all up a bit.
Any thoughts on whether it is a good idea to do right away or should I wait until after the second worming dose?
 

Judy

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I should mention that a pale comb is just a lesser degree of exygen deprivation than a blue comb. Pale can be due to anemia rather than oxygen deprivation from something like heart failure, for example, but the bottom line is still that the comb isn't getting enough oxygen.
 

21hens-incharge

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Update on Lilly Underfoot.
She is looking better today. 4 days after deworming and finally her comb is looking less blue. She is more active today as well.
I assume it is because she is getting more oxygen in the blood or circulation is improving.
I am very thankful for the help I have gotten and all the great information here at BYC.
I really thought she was a goner.
I plan on doing the second dose on the 10th day and again in the fall with valbazen.
I will look for the avian super pack in the morning. I did give them the vitamin B12 that I have day before yesterday. Lilly was not pleased.
Tomorrow they all will get some yogurt with oatmeal for their treat.

Great thanks go to Judy and Carafarmgirl for all the info. I think it has really helped Miss Lilly.
 
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