What class or how do you enter Seramas in Open Shows???

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by ChirpNEggBaby, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. ChirpNEggBaby

    ChirpNEggBaby Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 19, 2011
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    Since they arent APA recognized,,,,,what do you put on your entry forms?? Curious (and a little dumb) [​IMG]
     
  2. smoothmule

    smoothmule Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, they "are" APA and ABA recognized as of earlier this year. The white variety is the only recognized variety at this point but more are coming along. Probably black to be next. So, the simple answer to your question would be to enter them like you do any other recognized breed. [​IMG]
     
  3. poniesnchicks

    poniesnchicks Out Of The Brooder

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    What we do if they are not white is enter them as "AOC" (all other color) so the can be judged against each other rather than by their classified color. The non-whites are sooooo many different colors and variations of colors that it seems no two are alike. I don't know if that's the proper protocol, but that's how we do it, and I noticed that is how it was done at Crossroads in Indiana.
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    AOV (V for variety) is the proper terminology.
     
  5. poniesnchicks

    poniesnchicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Yep...that's right...my bad!
     
  6. catwalk

    catwalk Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 19, 2009
    A judge told me to enter whites as "white American Serama" and any other color as "American Serama". Booted, Silkied, and Frizzled get entered as "Booted American Serama", etc., but only put the word "white" with these if the bird is frizzled. The white frizzles are judged against the white smooth feathered birds, but the white silkied and booted are judged with the rest.

    I have been to shows where some birds are entered as "American Serama" and others have "AOV American Serama"on the card. These birds sometimes get judged separately, so keep it simple.
     
  7. Narragansett

    Narragansett Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:This is incorrect. The White American Serama has only been recognized by the ABA, not the APA.
     
  8. Narragansett

    Narragansett Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:There is no such class as AOV, or AOB for that matter. You enter any unrecognized breed or variety simply as whatever name you wish to call it. It is up to the judge to realize that the breed or variety is unrecognized, and place it only as far as appropriate. A show secretary is not going to understand what you are talking about when they receive an entry marked AOV or AOB.
     
  9. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:There is no such class as AOV, or AOB for that matter. You enter any unrecognized breed or variety simply as whatever name you wish to call it. It is up to the judge to realize that the breed or variety is unrecognized, and place it only as far as appropriate. A show secretary is not going to understand what you are talking about when they receive an entry marked AOV or AOB.

    Why do you always seem to fault everything I say? I had a conversation with a licensed judge the other day regarding AOV, and I've conversed with several others as well. A commonly used software application for online entries for poultry shows uses both AOB and AOV.
     
  10. Narragansett

    Narragansett Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:There is no such class as AOV, or AOB for that matter. You enter any unrecognized breed or variety simply as whatever name you wish to call it. It is up to the judge to realize that the breed or variety is unrecognized, and place it only as far as appropriate. A show secretary is not going to understand what you are talking about when they receive an entry marked AOV or AOB.

    Why do you always seem to fault everything I say? I had a conversation with a licensed judge the other day regarding AOV, and I've conversed with several others as well. A commonly used software application for online entries for poultry shows uses both AOB and AOV.

    I'm sorry if you feel that way, but I only fault what is incorrect. I have been exhibiting poultry and other species for many, many years, including one unrecognized duck breed and one unrecognized goose variety. It is an unfortunate fact that simply having a judge's license does not always make one 100% correct. There are many examples where unrecognized breeds or varieties have been awarded BB or even class champion, by a judge who should have but didn't know that the breed or variety has not been recognized. Not all computer programs are developed by people who are as familiar with the subject as they should be. At least one popular show management software has been developed by a pigeon breeder, and has been modified for use in poultry too. In pigeons it is very common to have an AOV class, in many breeds, but it does not occur in APA or ABA sanctioned shows. The closest that we have to what you're talking about is the APA AOSB Class, but that is a class made up of already recognized breeds that don't fit into any of the other classes. It's not a place to enter anything that is not recognized. Maybe that's what is confusing you. If you think that I am the one who is incorrect, please show me anywhere in the APA or ABA Standards, or in the show rules of either club, where there is an allowance to enter an unrecognized bird in a sanctioned show in an AOV class.

    The way it works is, you simply enter whatever bird you have, under whatever breed and variety name you think it is. Technically, you can even enter a mixed breed if you like. It will be judged against any others of it's kind. To give you an example to maybe simplify it for you: let's say that you and I breed Wasserflugels. I breed green, you breed pink, and a few green. We both enter several birds. The judge will judge them, though there is no Standard, so he has nothing to go by. He could pick one because he likes the color of your water cups better, or for any other reason. With no competition, you win BV Pink Wasserflugel. I win BV green, and also BB. You win RV green. That's as far as we go. My BB cannot be considered for the American, Continental, AOSB, or if a bantam, SCCL, Featherleg, etc, or for any other class champion. It's as as simple as that. There is no protocol, no allowance for an AOV class.
     

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