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What did you use on your pop door?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by DreamsInPink, May 18, 2016.

  1. DreamsInPink

    DreamsInPink Chillin' With My Peeps

    The frame of my pop door will be on the outside of the door... so there will be no lip or edge to get ahold of. Will that be safe?
     
  2. potato chip

    potato chip Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    Mine has a horizontal sliding door with a length of timber attached so it can be pushed and pulled from the outside of the run. I'm not in a high predator area (suburbs). If a raccoon could open this (they seem crafty and clever?) some means of locking it could be done.
     
  3. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    Without actually seeing it I could not give an opinion... My comment was in regards to the guy in the video saying something along the lines of 'it's not going to happen' in regards to a predator getting in... IMO you should never underestimate how clever raccoons are, a good rule of thumb is that if given time a 6 year old can defeat the lock then a coon can as well...

    Read the study linked, below and the results it should open your mind on how clever they are... This was only a single limited study and the raccoons figured out multiple latches, patterns and ingenious ways to use all their body parts to manipulate the latches...

    I have little doubt that a raccoon could defeat the hinge latch as depicted in the video... A simple fix to make it much more secure is to enclose the entire hinge system and hide the cord completely, as a coon very well might even figure out pulling the cord just like you opens the door...

    Skip to page 19 to see the results of latch puzzles... https://ia801601.us.archive.org/18/items/jstor-1412576/1412576.pdf
     
  4. bigoledude

    bigoledude Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've seen coons circumvent some pretty complex deterrents. But, I don't think a herd of coons could figure the hinge thing out. Especially if you give them no gap at all from the outside to reach under. I would cover my wooden door with the thin galvanized sheet metal from Home Depot to prevent them from getting any "gription". The sheet metal would provide both weather and predator protection

    We were camping near the Gulf of Mexico, about 40 miles from the boat launch. We didn't unload the boats right away. When we finally got around to unloading, we found coons in the bottom of the "grocery" boat with cans of Vienna sausage open and pigging out!!! They had gotten them out of a latched ice chest. So, I know how clever they can be.
     
  5. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    Yes the raccoons over in the America's are quite crafty and clever, basically if you want security use a keyed or combination locking system as they will defeat pretty much anything else if given time to figure it out... They will even figure out how to turn and open door knobs to houses... Had that experience personally last year when I was on vacation camping and staying in a Yurt that had a regular house door, come midnight we were woke up by the door knob being turned and something pushing against the door like someone was trying to get in... The door of the yurt had a dead bolt so entry was not made, but when I opened the door to investigate I was confronted with a team of three raccoons staring at me... They returned several more times each night to try the door...
     
  6. potato chip

    potato chip Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    From the other side of the world, and not having to deal with them trying to eat MY chickens, I have a sneaking admiration for them...

    Just thought, my arrangement could be locked with a hasp and staple and a padlock.

    Edit: You can see the door in this photo

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2016
  7. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    They are fascinating critters, I had one as a pet when I was very young and would love to have another at some point... My parents ended up re-homing the one I had as a child after about a year as it was just too clever for it's own good and nothing but trouble... Before re-homing it we had to pretty much keep it locked in a cage or if let it out close and constant monitoring as the minute you turned your back or lost sight, you had a 20lb critter emptying the refrigerator, cabinets and the pantries onto the floor looking for food... He would leave nothing un-turned...
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2016
  8. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    My hinge when it comes to rest lays flat unlike in video where it lays at 90º. It is also always falls on the back side of the door a nut on the line or sinker will insure gravity always works in your favour. Away from tiny tinkering hands.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2016
  9. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    In a perfect world you may be alright.
    My door was like that for years with no problems.
    I added the hinge for insurance.
    Mine is not exactly installed the same as on the video a bit more simpler and the hinge is weighted and only falls one way and lays flat when in the lock position.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2016
  10. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    One excellent point that was brought up we all should note If a human can pull the cord and open the door so can a raccoon.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2016

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