What do you do with Snowflake quail?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Kherome, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. Kherome

    Kherome Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I keep seeing people talk about snowflake quail, but what do you do with them? Are they just pets like button quail? Can you eat them? They must lay some wee eggs, compared to Coturnix so I can't imagine it's for eggs? Thanks
     
  2. gamebirdsonly

    gamebirdsonly Overrun With Chickens

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    Eat them or sell them.[​IMG]
     
  3. peanut1981

    peanut1981 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 5, 2014
    Eat them, the eggs, and sell both to! Taste like any other quail.
     
  4. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Snowflake quail are bobwhites, so yes the eggs are a bit smaller than coturnix but the birds will only be just a hair smaller full grown. All quail don't taste alike. Coturnix are 100% dark meat (all coturnix, even A&Ms), whereas bobwhites have white meat breasts and dark meat on their legs and wings.

    Colored mutations of the bobwhite tend to be even more aggressive than northern bobs so they can be a bit of a headache to raise, but they are quite beautiful to watch. Bobwhites have more of their natural instinct intact so their behavior is much more interesting. By intelligence comparison coturnix are really stupid.

    Bobwhites will stay wilder and take much more work to tame down. They will only lay eggs from may to august stopping after they have laid about 100 eggs. Using artificial lights you can push the number up to 200 eggs per year but you have to let them rest a couple months in between.

    The snowflake quail mutation was discovered by Gunrunner which is a bird dog trainer that has been raising bobwhites for many years. On his own the guy responsible managed to create an entirely new color of bobwhite by carefully managing his genetics. It really is pretty impressive. You can read about their creation on the Gunrunner website or Vails quails.
     

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