What to use as a grit/shell feeder?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by mylovelyladies, May 2, 2008.

  1. mylovelyladies

    mylovelyladies Out Of The Brooder

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    May 1, 2008
    My girls have been here since Wednesday and so far I haven't given them any grit or oyster shell. I was just going to sprinkle it in their feed but then I read not to. Today I got a soft shelled egg so I want to start today. What should I use as a feeder? Would a plastic bowl do? Can I put the grit and shell together (side by side or mixed?)? The coop is starting to seem crowded with feed and water and needing to add additional feeders!
     
  2. greenmulberry

    greenmulberry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a hanging rabbit feeder I used to put the oyster shell in, but now I just toss a handful here and there in with the food.
     
  3. the simple life

    the simple life Chillin' With My Peeps

    At what age do you start giving the oyster shell?
     
  4. lauralou

    lauralou Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I put my oyster shell in a concrete block, outside in the run. I filled the bottom of the hole up with big rocks, then poured the oyster shell in. It came in a 50 pound bag, so I figured I could afford to waste a bit of it.

    Every now and then I stir it up, as it gets kinda compacted and solid after a big rain. Also, I scoop some out and toss it on the ground around the block occasionally.

    My first chickens were grown when I got them, so I'm not sure exactly when you start using it. If you think they are near laying age, go ahead and put some out.

    I bought some grit when I got the chickens, and had it in a little dish, but they seemed to get all the grit they needed from the ground, and never ate any of the grit I bought.
     
  5. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I would add it when they start laying. I also beat mine with a hammer cause the pieces look so big and sharp. Right now I'm trying Tums, LOL
     
  6. HR Patterson

    HR Patterson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I put my oyster shell in a concrete block, outside in the run. I filled the bottom of the hole up with big rocks, then poured the oyster shell in. It came in a 50 pound bag, so I figured I could afford to waste a bit of it.

    When it rains doesn't it all turn to mush?
    We use these small feeders from Agway for about $4 each. This way we can keep it fresh and monitor that they are actually eating it. We also mix the crushed eggshell in with the oyseter shell, I think this has helped "cure" our eggeating problem.:eek:
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    Last edited: May 4, 2008
  7. mylovelyladies

    mylovelyladies Out Of The Brooder

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    It's interesting that you think mixing in the eggshell has helped cure your egg-eating problem - we have that problem too but I thought the consensus was that letting them eat the shells would encourage them to eat their eggs??
     
  8. HR Patterson

    HR Patterson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We collect our egg shells, then rinse and bake them. Afterwards, we crush them into little pieces, then mix these with oyster shell. I think some chickens don't care for the oyster shell, but will eat the crushed egg shell, getting more calcium that way, rather than going for the eggs that have been laid.
     
  9. cajunlizz

    cajunlizz Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2008
    Lafayette, Louisiana
    Quote:OK to mix the oyster shells with the regular chicken scratch and laying pellets ? and HOW MUCH ?
     
  10. Barnyard Dawg

    Barnyard Dawg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We don't feed our chickens any grit or egg/oyster shell, never had a problem with soft eggs or them eating the eggs.
     

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