What would it take to make an abandoned homesite

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by tazcat70, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. tazcat70

    tazcat70 I must be crazy!

    liveable?

    Ok here is a little background information..or actually what information I have.

    It is less than 3 acres, it has 2 old barns, and old chicken coop, and a dilapidated house. One of the barns would have to be torn down and the house. I went out and saw it, and wow, it is in HORRIBLE shape. The outhouse made me wonder.

    There is no rural water to the house (it is across the road), or septic system, the outhouse was it. There is an old windmill with a well beneath it, no idea if it is good, the face (?) of the windmill is missing.

    The house will HAVE to be demolished, there is no saving it. There is electricity to the property (at least I saw a pole...)

    The large barn looks pretty good, it would need a new roof for sure.

    The chicken coop looks like it was a catch all, it also has about 12" of dirt (most likely 50+ years of chickens) above the door frame.

    It also has an old concrete silo.

    So my questions are these...

    How much does it usually cost to run water, septic (I think there may be a rural system), electricity, and demolish a house.

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. georgialee

    georgialee Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 9, 2009
    Knoxville, TN
    I think the electricity and water would probably be around $5,000 max depending on how far they have to run it. Septic would probably be around another 5k. No idea on demolishing. Sounds like a big project!
     
  3. PamsPride

    PamsPride Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you are not looking to salvage the wood from the house you could call your local fire department and they could have a practice burn in the house (they light a fire and put it out several times) and burn it all down for you.
    I have seen two local people now turn a HUGE barn into a house. They are nice!
     
  4. ChickBond 007

    ChickBond 007 Licensed to Cull

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    Feb 26, 2009
    Madison County, Iowa
    We've just spent the last 2 years building a house in the country. We ran water, electricity, septic -- all the things you speak about except the demo. Septic runs 8000-10000 depending upon code in your area, the amount of natural drop in your septic field area, and whether a sand filtration system is required due to "perk" or lack there of. Running electricity depends on the # of feet from the current power location to the new (and safe) junction box. The underground portion is the most expensive piece of that. Running water depends upon whether there is rural water system available and again, how many feet must be dug underground to deliver the water to the box. There is also a fee for the meter box (in a pit typically.)
    Building is less expensive now due to the economy but still very pricey.
    It all depends on what you are seeking.
    You can PM me and I can share more info on specific instances if you would like.
    Life in the country is worth every penny.
     
  5. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    I am going to chime in with the cost of new construction for a home: I was estimate, in your area, for a 2000 sq foot home, around $100K. Just going by home prices and constructions pricing.
     
  6. English Chick

    English Chick English Mum

    Jun 27, 2008
    Cheshire UK
    I can't answer any of your wuestions, but I do wish you the very est of luck should you go ahead with it.......

    Re new home building, it might be worth givein Opa a PM he is a house builder.
     
  7. tazcat70

    tazcat70 I must be crazy!

    It doesn't look like it is going to happen. Thanks for everyones help.
     
  8. R@ndy

    [email protected] Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 20, 2009
    Taneytown
    As far as tearing down the barn and house a lot of times you can donate them to your local fire dept. to burn for training, not much left after they are done and will cut down on removal costs.
     

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