When can Keets leave the brooder?

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by Dean W, Feb 11, 2013.

  1. Dean W

    Dean W Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 8, 2013
    Central Texas
    I just got some keets a few days ago. But I'm wondering when they can leave the brooder. I'm expecting some baby chicks in approximately three weeks and I'll need the space. The weather has been warm here so I expect in 3 weeks for it to be just as warm if no warmer. So could I put them in a small pen then?

    Any suggestions appreciated.
     
  2. JLeigh

    JLeigh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 19, 2012
    North Georgia
    They'll need a heat lamp until they're fully feathered. The rule of temperature reduction is the same for guineas as for chicks. Starting at 95 degrees for week one, reduce the heat 5 degrees per week until 70 degrees - that's six weeks under controlled temps. I usually go an extra week at 75 or 70 degrees because I'm a wuss, or the weather outside requires it. I also use the heat lamp outside if the temps get colder than "seasonal" for a week or two. I guess what I'm saying is that once the six weeks is up, I still ease them into the outside temps. But that's just me.

    I wouldn't put them on the ground until they're at least six weeks - but if you have a coop, you can heat that with a lamp and get around keeping them in a brooder for the entire six weeks. (edit)
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2013
  3. Dean W

    Dean W Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 8, 2013
    Central Texas
    Thank you Jleigh. That was a little more than I expected, but I think I can pull it off.

    Regards,
     
  4. JLeigh

    JLeigh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 19, 2012
    North Georgia
    Depending on where your coop is located, you can run an extension cord to the coop, which is what I do. Although for many people that's impossible.

    I don't know what kind of set up you have for your keets now, but here are some inexpensive suggestions for keeping keets and chicks separate, and brood them up in the house or garage (whatever).

    PeepsCA makes "mini-brooders" out of large Sterilite bins - and now I do too. It's cheap, quick and very functional, AND it keeps a lot of the dust down. Find the largest clear bin you can and cut out a big square from the top cover, and cover the hole with hardware cloth. I put electrical wire around the perimeter of the hardware cloth so it doesn't snag my clothing or poke into my hands (I hate that stuff). Secure the cloth to the top of the bin by drilling holes into the top. Then use zip ties to attach the cloth to the top. Hang a heat lamp over it to the right temperature - raising it each week to lower the temp. Does that make sense?

    I use these bins for my keets and chicks and it's good for about two weeks depending on how many keets/chicks you put in there. It might buy you some time with your chicks until the keets move outside. It will enable you to keep the keets and chicks separate. Keets larger than chicks will trample your chicks, so you really need to keep them separate.

    You can also keep chicks (not keets) in a kiddie pool for a couple of weeks. I've done that too, but the dust from the chicks, feed and bedding is something I don't want to deal with twice. :).

    Big thanks to PeepsCA for all her info on this forum. Just about everything I've learned, I've learned from her. Well - actually, EVERYTHING I've learned has come from her. I read, read, read...[​IMG].
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. Dean W

    Dean W Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 8, 2013
    Central Texas
    Yes, that makes sense. I have a large water trough that i made a lid for. I put lights above it to keep them warm that way.

    I have noticed a lot of good post from Peeps too. I need to continue reading. I've had guineas in the past, but it's been years ago.

    Thanks for all the information.
     

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