Which roo should I keep? Welsummer or splash Orpington

Laceylatti

In the Brooder
Apr 27, 2020
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so far 3 of my 6 chicks are cockerels. The welsummer, spitzhauben, and splash Orpington. I think the spitzhauben is out. Any suggestions on which one I should keep? They are all beautiful, and each have things I like about them.
 

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Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
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southern Michigan
Welcome!
What are your breeding goals? What pullets do you have? Temperaments of each so far?
If everyone is getting along, give yourself more time to decide.
Poor conformation or poor behaviors should be negatives, and after that, it's who fits with your plans best. Maybe it's just because you like one much more than the other, and that's fine too.
Depending on the space available, and how they behave, both could maybe stay. Or not, it just depends. Do you want offspring with darker egg colors, or to develop that blue color scheme and white legs?
Mary
 

EmilyRobb

Songster
Premium Feather Member
May 12, 2020
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Southwestern Manitoba
@Laceylatti is there anything specific that you want in the future for your flock? Try to make some sort of rough plan, and then choose a rooster based on what pros they can bring to your flock. I agree that both are beautiful, and it would be a tough decision based on looks alone.

If you are able, maybe note their mannerisms and behaviors, and whoever is the nice guy will be the keeper, but that's also up to your discretion. If you aren't concerned about the mannerisms, then you'll just have to make a game plan as for what your goals are and simply pick based on that, whether it be docile behavior, protection/guard, breeding, color, show, etc.
 

LaFleche

Crossing the Road
8 Years
Sep 22, 2012
5,848
21,604
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Germany
As already mentioned above, it always depends on what you want for your flock.

To help you with your decision, here are some facts about the breeds and traits that the chosen cockerel/rooster will pass on to their future offspring:

Appenzeller Spitzhauben: ~ 100-150 white eggs of ~55g
Welsummer: ~ 160-180 dark brown eggs of up to 75 g - double purpose good meat
Bantam Welsummer: ~ 180 dark brown eggs of up to 60 g
Orpington: ~ 160 light brown eggs of ~55 g - double purpose good meat

In case the Orpington or Appenzeller Spitzhauben are bantams the above data will have to be revised accordingly.
 

Laceylatti

In the Brooder
Apr 27, 2020
33
20
26
Thank you all for your thoughtful responses.
I’m just a backyard chicken gal, so no real purpose except potentially wanting offspring that produce green eggs, and a rooster that isn’t too harsh with the others.
I have 1 ameraucana, 1 barnevelder, and 1 black copper Marans.
My welsummer is beautiful but he is a bit of a bully toward the other chickens. I worry he might get mean, but I love the look of him and like the idea of the darker eggs. So far he hasn’t hurt any of the other ones.
The Orpington is so sweet, and the only one who will eat out of my hand. He doesn’t bully anyone. The ameraucana pullet and my Orpington cockerel are best buds, and the ameraucana cry’s loudly whenever I take the Orpington even for a second. Im concerned she may never recover if I take her buddy.
 
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Laceylatti

In the Brooder
Apr 27, 2020
33
20
26
Welcome!
What are your breeding goals? What pullets do you have? Temperaments of each so far?
If everyone is getting along, give yourself more time to decide.
Poor conformation or poor behaviors should be negatives, and after that, it's who fits with your plans best. Maybe it's just because you like one much more than the other, and that's fine too.
Depending on the space available, and how they behave, both could maybe stay. Or not, it just depends. Do you want offspring with darker egg colors, or to develop that blue color scheme and white legs?
Mary
Hi Mary, thank you for your response. So it’s possible to have two Roos cohabitate? I’m new to chickens
 

Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
23,172
38,192
1,096
southern Michigan
With only three pullets (is that right?) one cockerel would be better, because two will probably be too much for your girls!
Depending on what you mean, bullying isn't good. On the other hand, cockerels who are too friendly with humans can grow up lacking respect, not a good thing either. BOs in general have a better reputation than Wellies as far as human aggressive behaviors are concerned, but each bird is an individual, so that's not helpful, really.
As a new chicken owner, you might miss behaviors in your cockerels early on, so do some reading about roosters, it may help you see them better.
Mary
 

Laceylatti

In the Brooder
Apr 27, 2020
33
20
26
With only three pullets (is that right?) one cockerel would be better, because two will probably be too much for your girls!
Depending on what you mean, bullying isn't good. On the other hand, cockerels who are too friendly with humans can grow up lacking respect, not a good thing either. BOs in general have a better reputation than Wellies as far as human aggressive behaviors are concerned, but each bird is an individual, so that's not helpful, really.
As a new chicken owner, you might miss behaviors in your cockerels early on, so do some reading about roosters, it may help you see them better.
Mary
Thank you for that information Mary! I will start doing research and rooster behavior
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
11 Years
Nov 12, 2009
8,952
11,350
636
western South Dakota
Truthfully, I would recommend no roosters. Roosters take experience, and even then, they are a crapshoot. Wait a year, then add a rooster if you think you really want one. Even one rooster with 3 hens is apt to cause a lot of problems.

A lot will depend on your space and set up. Often times people new to chickens have too small of set up, because often times prefab set ups say they can have up to 6 chickens, when they really can barely hold 3 standard birds. Roosters need more room then hens. Measure your set up, and post some pictures.

And if you have small children, then I strongly recommend not keeping any of the roosters, as children tend to be attacked first, then women and finally even men will be attacked by an aggressive rooster. Inexperienced people often do not pick up on the cues a rooster is giving, and the attack comes out of no where. People often under estimate the violence of a rooster attack if they have never seen one.

Mrs K
 

Laceylatti

In the Brooder
Apr 27, 2020
33
20
26
Truthfully, I would recommend no roosters. Roosters take experience, and even then, they are a crapshoot. Wait a year, then add a rooster if you think you really want one. Even one rooster with 3 hens is apt to cause a lot of problems.

A lot will depend on your space and set up. Often times people new to chickens have too small of set up, because often times prefab set ups say they can have up to 6 chickens, when they really can barely hold 3 standard birds. Roosters need more room then hens. Measure your set up, and post some pictures.

And if you have small children, then I strongly recommend not keeping any of the roosters, as children tend to be attacked first, then women and finally even men will be attacked by an aggressive rooster. Inexperienced people often do not pick up on the cues a rooster is giving, and the attack comes out of no where. People often under estimate the violence of a rooster attack if they have never seen one.

Mrs K
 

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