Why are duck eggs making my husband sick?

MTKitty

Songster
Aug 14, 2021
471
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MT
Interesting thread. I’d never considered there would be enough difference among the various species of egg-layers to cause problems.

I am curious if the sensitivity is to direct consumption of the egg? Or does it include any food preparation that includes egg (such as cakes)?
 

Crazy Maizie

Crowing
Jul 3, 2020
3,065
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Interesting thread. I’d never considered there would be enough difference among the various species of egg-layers to cause problems.

I am curious if the sensitivity is to direct consumption of the egg? Or does it include any food preparation that includes egg (such as cakes)?
It has to do with the differences in proteins from what I found through research.
It can definitely cross over into baked goods. I baked with them this past summer; and at first, I had no reaction. But, the more cake I ate (a few pieces within a few days), the reaction occurred again. I was hoping it didn't cross over for me, because then I could at least use them in baking. I suppose it depends on the individual.
One thing I read compared the allergies of eggs to that of milk. Some cannot drink cows milk but are ok with goats milk and vice versa. There's enough of a nutrient difference between the two.
 
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HollowOfWisps

Previously AstroDuck
Aug 28, 2020
1,563
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Iowa
Interesting thread. I’d never considered there would be enough difference among the various species of egg-layers to cause problems.

I am curious if the sensitivity is to direct consumption of the egg? Or does it include any food preparation that includes egg (such as cakes)?
I can't eat any food made with duck eggs including baked goods🤷
 

MTKitty

Songster
Aug 14, 2021
471
2,395
236
MT
It has to do with the differences in proteins from what I found through research.
It can definitely cross over into baked goods. I baked with them this past summer; and at first, I had no reaction. But, the more cake I ate (a few pieces within a few days), the reaction occurred again. I was hoping it didn't cross over for me, because then I could at least use them in baking. I suppose it depends on the individual.
One thing I read compared the allergies of eggs that of milk. Some cannot drink cows milk but are ok with goats milk and vice versa. There's enough of a nutrient difference between the two.
With that perspective, it makes sense. I learned something today. My brain’s full. 🥴
 

cheezenkwackers

Crowing
5 Years
Aug 28, 2016
1,541
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Memphis, TN
It has to do with the differences in proteins from what I found through research.
It can definitely cross over into baked goods. I baked with them this past summer; and at first, I had no reaction. But, the more cake I ate (a few pieces within a few days), the reaction occurred again. I was hoping it didn't cross over for me, because then I could at least use them in baking. I suppose it depends on the individual.
One thing I read compared the allergies of eggs to that of milk. Some cannot drink cows milk but are ok with goats milk and vice versa. There's enough of a nutrient difference between the two.
My son is not allergic to eggs but Annatto (a tree seed ground up and used as a natural orange colorant). His allergist compared his allergy to a leaky boat. He said, a little doesn’t sink you but it can add up and swamp the boat. 🤷‍♀️
 

Crazy Maizie

Crowing
Jul 3, 2020
3,065
5,594
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My son is not allergic to eggs but Annatto (a tree seed ground up and used as a natural orange colorant). His allergist compared his allergy to a leaky boat. He said, a little doesn’t sink you but it can add up and swamp the boat. 🤷‍♀️
Interesting analogy. It definitely makes sense.
 

BlondieSoup

Chirping
Apr 17, 2021
66
149
81
Leander, TX
I always used to refrigerate my duck eggs just in case. Ducks drop those things all over the place and they're usually dirtier than chicken eggs. Obviously if they were too dirty they didn't get eaten (or, ahem, laid in the pool..) Maybe try refrigerating from the get-go and skipping the bleach? Though I agree with several others that the most likely cause may be an allergy or sensitivity on your husband's part.
 

chickengr

Crossing the Road
7 Years
Dec 29, 2014
5,488
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greece
he ate 4 eggs? wasn't that too much? also washing eggs in bleach is not a good idea as someone mentioned.

I had a milk intolerance as a kid. I started drinking 1/4 of cup, than 1/2 etc. till my stomach was able to digest it. maybe your husband can start with 1/2 eg in 2-3 days. I guess such a small amount will do no harm.
 

Crazy Maizie

Crowing
Jul 3, 2020
3,065
5,594
451
he ate 4 eggs? wasn't that too much? also washing eggs in bleach is not a good idea as someone mentioned.

I had a milk intolerance as a kid. I started drinking 1/4 of cup, than 1/2 etc. till my stomach was able to digest it. maybe your husband can start with 1/2 eg in 2-3 days. I guess such a small amount will do no harm.
Knowing my reaction to duck eggs, I wouldn't do this. As the reaction kept getting worse every time I ate them before I figured out what it was.
Its horrible and I'm pretty sure you could make it into more than an intolerance by continuing to subject yourself to such torture - dizziness, sweats, diarrhea, nausea, sleeping half of the day, etc...
 

Ebony Rose

Crowing
12 Years
May 26, 2009
2,634
5,988
471
David, Chiriquí, Panama
Knowing my reaction to duck eggs, I wouldn't do this. As the reaction kept getting worse every time I ate them before I figured out what it was.
Its horrible and I'm pretty sure you could make it into more than an intolerance by continuing to subject yourself to such torture - dizziness, sweats, diarrhea, nausea, sleeping half of the day, etc...
Anaphylactic reaction comes to mind.
 

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