Why does my frazzle have silkied feathers? (PICS)

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by InsaneBreeder, May 25, 2011.

  1. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:Breed to a non frizzled, then breed the offspring back to the frizzled & silkied parent or to each other. You will probably get a percentage of silkied, non-frizzled offspring in the 2nd or 3rd generation.
     
  2. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:BOTH parents muct carry the silkie gene to have offfspring that are silkied. Or else there was some spontaneous mutation.
     
  3. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:if u breed this rooster to non related hen u well get frizzles and non frizzle that carrie the silkie gene b but wount show it

    What if I took one of the original hen's (the one with the suspected gene) flat-feathered offspring and bred it to another flat-feathered bird, and then bred the resulting offspring back to the first flat-feathered offspring, and continued in that manner, always breeding the offspring back to the flat-feathered, until the gene was apparent? Would that work?

    Both parents must be H+/h if they are not silkied, but produced silkied offspring. You can take the silkied bird and breed it back to its mother. About half the offpring will be silkied. If she is truly hom. for frizzle, they will still all be frizzled. But if you take those offspring that are silkied and het. for frizzle, and breed them back to the silkied parent, about 25% will be silkied and not frizzled.
     
  4. CupOJoe42

    CupOJoe42 CT Chicken Whisperer

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    I think he's/she's absolutely adorable!!!! Love it!
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2011
  5. chickendales

    chickendales Songster

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    the thing with the silke gene is that u need two gennes so u could breed to flats together and get a silkie if they both carrie it
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2011
  6. InsaneBreeder

    InsaneBreeder Songster

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    Quote:Breed to a non frizzled, then breed the offspring back to the frizzled & silkied parent or to each other. You will probably get a percentage of silkied, non-frizzled offspring in the 2nd or 3rd generation.

    Thanks, I'll try that. Only I might try to produce a pure-colored silkied frizzle first, and then do it with that, so that I won't be working with a mixed bird.
     
  7. InsaneBreeder

    InsaneBreeder Songster

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    Quote:BOTH parents muct carry the silkie gene to have offfspring that are silkied. Or else there was some spontaneous mutation.

    Then that would make sense, because I bred the hen to one of her own offspring (who apparently inherited the silkie gene) to get the silkied offspring, so both genes must have been present.
     
  8. InsaneBreeder

    InsaneBreeder Songster

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    Quote:What if I took one of the original hen's (the one with the suspected gene) flat-feathered offspring and bred it to another flat-feathered bird, and then bred the resulting offspring back to the first flat-feathered offspring, and continued in that manner, always breeding the offspring back to the flat-feathered, until the gene was apparent? Would that work?

    Both parents must be H+/h if they are not silkied, but produced silkied offspring. You can take the silkied bird and breed it back to its mother. About half the offpring will be silkied. If she is truly hom. for frizzle, they will still all be frizzled. But if you take those offspring that are silkied and het. for frizzle, and breed them back to the silkied parent, about 25% will be silkied and not frizzled.

    I'll try that too. But the only thing is, I am pretty sure that the silkied one is a frazzle (due to its early baldness, and the possibility of its father also being a frazzle), and if I breed it back to the frizzle mother, won't it be impossible to get non-frizzles? I have read that breeding a frazzle to a flat-feathered will produce 100% frizzles, and so wouldn't breeding a frazzle to a frizzle be even worse (in hopes of obtaining a non-frizzle, that is)?
     
  9. InsaneBreeder

    InsaneBreeder Songster

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    Quote:Haha, thanks [​IMG] But I am quite sure it is a he [​IMG]
     
  10. nurse_turtle

    nurse_turtle Songster

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    You cannot breed a frizzle to a frizzle. The frizzle gene is not "carried". The frizzle gene is dominant. A chicken even has it or it doesn't as indicated by curled feathers. Your babies may be frazzles which will not be able to hold full plumage as adult chickens but instead will look more porcupine-ish. It's not a good thing to have a frazzle.
     

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