Why Vomit for Sour Crop?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ChickenGirl22, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. ChickenGirl22

    ChickenGirl22 Out Of The Brooder

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    My roo has sour crop. Lately we've been vomiting him and giving him vet recommended antibiotics, but it hasn't helped very much. It has come to our attention that vomiting is only a temporary fix and often he just ends up stressed and eating even more after we vomit him. What I really want to know is what exactly does the vomiting do? Is it necessary for the recovery process?
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2012
  2. janinepeters

    janinepeters Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It doesn't really accomplish anything, and it makes no sense to do it, IMO. Vomiting the chicken doesn't dislodge whatever is impacting the crop (assuming it is impacted), it just removes the stuff that cannot make it past that obstruction. You have proven this by vomiting him, and discovering that the crop just fills up again. But more importantly, inducing him to vomit can cause him to aspirate some of the crop contents into the lungs. The result is "aspiration pneumonia", which can be deadly.
     
  3. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Antibiotic's? For sour crop? Generally you would want to be giving PRObiotic's and/or an antifungal. You want that good bacteria in there to help get and keep things moving as they should.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. janinepeters

    janinepeters Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I haven't dealt with this problem yet, but have read that anti-fungals (maybe that's what OP meant by "antibiotic") can help, since a fungal infection in the crop can be part of the problem. But weather the infection is a cause of poor crop motility or a result of food sitting around in an impacted crop, I know not.
     
  5. Smoochie

    Smoochie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nvm
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  6. Smoochie

    Smoochie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nvm
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  7. janinepeters

    janinepeters Chillin' With My Peeps

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    But if it doesn't clear the obstruction, the sour crop will recur. The OP has shown that exactly that is happening. To get rid of this problem, the obstructing material needs to be removed. If vomiting doesn't take care of it, do not continue to vomit him repeatedly. I agree with the OP that this is extremely stressful for the bird. Again, induced vomiting can cause aspiration pneumonia. If this is a beloved pet, and money is no object, I would take him to a vet. There is info online, I believe, about do it yourself surgery for impacted crop, but I personally would prefer to put a bird out of its misery than subject it to surgery with no anesthetic.
     
  8. Smoochie

    Smoochie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry bad advice. Hope your rooster feels better soon.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  9. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    I agree with the "Don't" vomit your chicken post.

    It may help with some discomfort, but it will not cure the bird of sour crop. I speak from experience. It can also be very damaging.

    Plain yoghurt with no sugar. Absolutely no sugar (natural or artificial) allowed until this clears up. No fruits, breads, or anything like that. Yoghurt and their regular food only - as well as water with ACV added.

    Massage the crop without making them sick just to keep things going. If they are pooping, things are passing.
     
  10. ChickenGirl22

    ChickenGirl22 Out Of The Brooder

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    He is quite stressed from it so we've stopped, but he's not doing very well. As for the antibiotics, a vet suggested them to us after we took him to her. He has a bacterial case so she thought they may help.
     

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