Will CASTRATING Roo's early change Roo-like behaviour????

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by JLMom, May 14, 2009.

  1. JLMom

    JLMom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 3, 2009
    Massachusetts
    Hi,
    My husband recently brought home week old pullet chicks( Supposedly)
    We really don't want roosters. But now my kids are naming them, even though I warned them that we are not keeping them if they turn out to be male. Has anyone ever castrated a young roo? (I mean had it done, not personally done it) Does it prevent them from crowing and chasing the ladies? Any ideas?
    Thanks!
     
  2. Last edited by a moderator: May 14, 2009
  3. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    The only reason for caponizing a rooster is to fatten him up to eat. If you don't want them being roosters, then just don't have a rooster. Caponizing can kill them.
     
  4. farrier!

    farrier! Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 28, 2009
    Southern Illinois
    As for your original question...Yes it will keep them from crowing and chasing girls if done properly. Like other critters if all the "stuff" is not gone you still may get a bit of aggression and crowing.
    It also makes them look more like the girls and they do not develop the rooster feathering.

    It seems to be a vanishing art. Finding someone who can do it well may be a problem.
     
  5. Chicks_N_Horses

    Chicks_N_Horses Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2009
    South Alabama
    I had NO clue you could do that to a roo! I didn't think they had 'parts' as other animals do.

    We castrate horses and pigs. Horses get tied to trees and pulled *gently* until stretched out and then snip snip. The horses take it like champs. Pigs get dropped in a bucket. They are little squeelers.

    Castrating a roo is a new one on me..I'm going to read those links...[​IMG]
     
  6. JLMom

    JLMom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 3, 2009
    Massachusetts
    Thanks for all the info. As for "just not having a rooster" (#3), I didn't plan on having any; I bought sexed chicks. However, even though I am new at this, from all I have read, even the hatcheries with their professionals only have a 90% accuracy rate. I am trying to plan ahead and keep any possible roosters alive. Let's face it, they are hard to get rid of (except for the cooking pot). I would hate for little Einstein or Galileo to go that way (Yes, my son likes scientists, not baseball players!)
     
  7. digitS'

    digitS' Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 12, 2007
    ID/WA border
    Capons get very large and very fat. They may be "boss" and maintain a pecking order but they are very passive.

    I had a little lady do this on a one for you/one for me deal. That was years ago and she is now in a nursing home [​IMG].

    Kind of hard to justify for me but I no longer raise meat birds. Keeping them for a pet is, well, not why I keep chickens in the 1st place. However, I no longer keep roosters either. . . . would make enemies of the neighbors.

    Steve
     
  8. gervais22

    gervais22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 21, 2008
    Ontario
    someone told me you do it to fatten up a rooster and there are a coupe of ways.

    One way someone ( a chef) said to get a heavy fishing string and just tie it round the testicles or something and with no blood flow they will eventually drop off. I don't know wether this will work but It don't sound nice!
     
  9. farrier!

    farrier! Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 28, 2009
    Southern Illinois
    Quote:Chicken parts are all on the inside.... [​IMG]
    So this does not work.
     
  10. gervais22

    gervais22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 21, 2008
    Ontario
    farrier! :

    Quote:Chicken parts are all on the inside.... [​IMG]
    So this does not work.

    Yeah I thought that too but he was certain it could be done. ???​
     

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