Will my girls lay eggs this year?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Berkshiremom, Sep 10, 2010.

  1. Berkshiremom

    Berkshiremom Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 1, 2010
    Western MA
    Hi, I have some chicks that were born the first week of June, They are 12 weeks right now, I have read on here that mosts pullets start laying around 20 to 24 weeks, which will make it Dec. when my girls will be old enough to start laying. Our coop does not have electricity so they will not have any extra light or heat, they do have outdoor access all day from 6:00 am till they decide to go in, normally around 7:00pm. So my question is will they lay this winter? or will I have to wait till spring for eggs? Also Is it better to buy chicks earlier in the year? I'm planning on ordering some more next year, and am thinking maybe I should order them earlier like Feb/March...any thoughts?
    Thanks
     
  2. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Overrun With Chickens

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    What kind of chickens? Some breeds are more likely to lay through the winter without supplemental light than others, and then even within breeds it varies from individual bird to individual bird. They may, they may not. I know, so helpful. [​IMG]

    There are pros and cons to ordering birds at any given point in the year. In June most places are warm enough that it makes chick care lower maintenance, which is nice, but as you're finding it could also delay egg production until the following spring. It's a tradeoff. Next year you'll already have these hens laying though, so it may not be as much of a disappointment to not get eggs from the new chickens until the following spring. So the tradeoff of less chick care may be worth it at that point. You have to decide what is best for your situation. [​IMG]
     
  3. Berkshiremom

    Berkshiremom Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 1, 2010
    Western MA
    The breeds I have are Salmon Faverolle, and Easter eggers...You are so right about getting chicks in June, It was so easy to move them out to the coop early, but I wasn't thinking in terms of when they would lay eggs...silly newbie that I am! I guess I am hoping that I may still get a few eggs over the winter..Hubby is already grumbling that our first egg has already cost over $900.00 and he hasn't even tasted it yet...lol One more question...If they don't start laying till spring, will I still get 2 years of good production out of them? I keep reading on here that most are only productive for 2 years, and that will make mine nearly a year before they start laying. Or are they most productive 2 years from the start of laying?
    Thanks
     
  4. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    My Coop
    The Favs should give you a few eggs the end of Nov.
    The EEs may not give you any eggs until Dec.

    Put a day light in the coop and you should get some eggs before Jan.
     
  5. adkchickmama

    adkchickmama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The first year I got chickens it was July. I had BA and Redstars. they matured in Dec and did lay eggs that year. You should be ok. If you want them to lay on a regular basis add some additional light to extend the daylight hours.
     
  6. HHandbasket

    HHandbasket The Chickeneer

    As far as the birds only laying for 2 years, that varies also. I've read threads on this board where people have had hens that were productive until about age 5, then slowed down and didn't stop producing eggs completely until they were 9 or 10 years old!!! Depending on breeds and conditions, the potential exists for a chicken to live into its teens and produce eggs for you for at least 5 or 6 years, if not longer.

    I've never known anyone whose chickens only laid eggs for 2 years, though. As long as they're well treated and healthy, they'll keep laying. Battery hens tend to only be productive for 1 to 2 years (those poor babies... breaks my heart when I think about what they go through).

    Of course, as with every animal, there are always variables. Your birds might only lay for 2 years, or they might lay for 10 years!
     

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